Summer 2018 Courses

AP/HIST 2731 3.0A: Introduction to Caribbean History

Course Director: D. Trotman, 326 Founders College, 416-736-2100 x33192, dtrotman@yorku.ca
Term: S1
Format: Online

Special Features: This is an online course.

Course Calendar Description:
This course introduces students to some of the major themes of Caribbean historical evolution from its indigenous occupation to 20th century socio-political developments. The emphasis is on providing a broad outline and an introduction to some of the key concepts and issues in the historiography of the Caribbean. Course credit exclusion: AP/HIST 2730 6.00.

Expanded Course Description:
After a discussion of what constitutes the Caribbean as an area of study, this course introduces students to Caribbean History through an examination of key scholarly problems in the scholarship of the historical development of the region.

These include:

  • The Indigenous Civilization: European intrusion and impact
  • The Plantation revolution and transformation
  • Contradictions, tensions and conflicts in Slave Plantation Society
  • Post slavery adjustments: continuities and change
  • USA interventions and the struggles for sovereignty
  • Caribbean Cultural development
  • Twentieth century economic challenges

The central text required for purchase for this course is Nicola Foote (ed), The Caribbean History Reader (Routledge,2013).

Additional required and recommended readings will be posted on Moodle.

For those who require a general narrative the following two texts are RECOMMENDED:

  • F.W. Knight, The Caribbean: The Genesis of a Fragmented Nationalism (Oxford, 1990)
  • B.W. Higman, A Concise History of the Caribbean (Cambridge, 2011)

Apart from an introduction to the pattern of historical development in this region, the intended outcome of the course is the contribution to the intellectual development of participants by developing a capacity for (a) reading with comprehension historical scholarship, (b) identifying differences in sources and their uses, (c) contributing to ongoing discussions on the impact of its peculiar history on the contemporary Caribbean (d) communicating their ideas in effective prose.

Tentative Grade Breakdown/Overview of Assessment:

  • Exam and Essay 40%
  • Quizzes, exercises, blog contributions 60%

NOTE: Prior to buying textbooks, students should consult the detailed course outline which will give the final versions of the weekly syllabus and the detailed breakdown of assignments with weighting and due dates.  The course outline will be posted in Moodle (if there is one for the course) and discussed on the first day of class.

More information:  http://history.laps.yorku.ca/

AP/HIST 3357 6.0A: Greece: A Modern History, from 1800 to the Present

Course Director: Sakis Gekas, 2120 Vari Hall, 416-736-2100 x30423, agekas@yorku.ca
Term: 03
Format: Summer Abroad
View Website for Details

Course Calendar Description:
This Study Abroad course analyzes some of the major developments in European and world history during the Nineteenth and Twentieth Century and then explains how those momentous changes were experienced in one country: Greece. Based on Athens but also taking trips for on site teaching the course provides in-depth understanding of major developments in recent Greek history and connects them to key moments European and world history.

AP/HIST 3580 6.0A: 20th Century Canada

Course Director: M. Martel, 2166 Vari Hall, 416-736-2100 x30429, mmartel@yorku.ca
Term: SU
Format: Lecture

Course Calendar Description:
An analysis of the major events and developments affecting Canadian society during the past hundred years, including political and constitutional evolution, economic and social change and alterations in the climate of ideas. Course credit exclusions: None.
PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusion: AS/HIST 3580 6.00.

Expanded Course Description:
The list of topics includes: The Industrial Revolution, The First World War, The Great Depression, The Second World War, immigration and multiculturalism, the construction of the Welfare State, the Sixties and Baby Boomers, Indigenous Peoples and society, Canadian International Relations, State Surveillance, and the development of new symbols and identity.

The course involves lectures by the course director and weekly discussions. The required readings are central to the course. The specific readings are indicated on the course outline.

Participants in this course will have the opportunity to acquire skills in critical analysis, historical research, and scholarly writing. There will be written assignments to improve academic skills.

Tentative Grade Breakdown/Overview of Assessment:

  • Written Assignment 1 (analysis of a feature movie): 20%
  • Written Assignment 2: 25%
  • Quizzes: 15%
  • Final Exam: 25%
  • Participation: 15%

NOTE: Prior to buying textbooks, students should consult the detailed course outline which will give the final versions of the weekly syllabus and the detailed breakdown of assignments with weighting and due dates.  The course outline will be posted in Moodle or distributed and discussed on the first day of class.

More information:  http://history.laps.yorku.ca/

AP/HIST 3860 6.0A: Modern History of the Jews

Course Director: K. Weiser,  754 Kaneff Tower, 416-736-2100 x33561, kweiser@yorku.ca
Term: SU
Format: Online

Course Calendar Description:
A survey of Jewish history from the breakdown of traditional society in the 18th century until the present. The focus will be on the Jews of Europe and the major offshoots of Jewish Europe, Israel and North America. Course credit exclusions: None. PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusion: AS/HIST 3860 6.00.

Expanded Course Description:
What defines the modern era in the history of the Jews? This course proposes multiple answers to that question as it explores developments in Jewish culture, identity, religion, and politics, as well as relations between Jews and their non-Jewish neighbours, from the sixteenth century until the present.  It employs a comparative perspective and surveys developments across the globe. Among the themes examined are the breakdown of traditional society, messianism, Emancipation and integration, religious reform, antisemitism, Jewish nationalism and socialism, the Holocaust, language politics, the emergence of the State of Israel, and trends in post-World War II Jewish life. The focus will be on the Jews of Europe and the Ottoman Empire and the centres of contemporary Jewish life, Israel and North America.

Students will become familiar with geographic, religious and cultural diversity among contemporary Jews and the major developments in Jewish identity and Jewish-non-Jewish relations in the last few centuries.

Readings (to be confirmed on the syllabus distributed at the beginning of the semester) will likely include selections from these books:

  1. Israel Bartal, The Jews of Eastern Europe, 1772-1881. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2005.
  2. Doris Bergen, War & Genocide. A Concise History of the Holocaust. (second edition) Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, Inc., 2009
  3. Jacob Katz, Out of the Ghetto. Syracuse, NY: Syracuse University Press, 1998
  4. Paul Mendes-Flohr and Jehuda Reinharz, The Jew in the Modern World. (third edition) New York: Oxford University Press, 2011.
  5. Zvi Gitelman, Century of Ambivalence. (second edition) Bloomington, IN: Indiana University Press, 2001

Tentative Grade Breakdown/Overview of Assessment:

  1. Powerpoint presentation explaining a historical document (25%)
  2. Mid-semester writing assignment (25%)
  3. On campus final examination (35%)
  4. Brief weekly responses to guided reading questions (15%)

NOTE: Prior to buying textbooks, students should consult the detailed course outline which will give the final versions of the weekly syllabus and the detailed breakdown of assignments with weighting and due dates.  The course outline will be posted in Moodle or distributed and discussed on the first day of class.

More information:  http://history.laps.yorku.ca/

AP/HIST 4699 6.0A: Selected Topics in US History

Course Director: B. Cothran, 2132 Vari Hall, 416-736-2100 x66959, cothran@yorku.ca
Term: SU
Format: Seminar

Course Calendar Description:
Research seminar on selected topics in US history. Topics vary from year to year. Please consult the History supplemental calendar for more details. Priority is given to History Honours majors and minors who have successfully completed at least 84 credits.
PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusion: AS/HIST 4699 6.00.

Expanded Course Description:
This course covers the history of the United States from the Civil War through World War I. These decades were a period of wrenching transition when Americans faced a new world created in the aftermath of the Civil War. They had to confront many challenges: How ought society's wealth be distributed? What were the meanings of race and gender? What would be the role of the United States in the world? In many respects this half-century is when the modern United States began, and its political, economic, and social legacies are still very much with us today.

The seminar will explore these years and focus on the following events and themes: Reconstruction; the emergence of industrial capitalism; the labour movement; Populism; changes in the armed forces; the establishment of Jim Crow; gender relations; the transformation of the United States from a continental to a global power; Progressivism; and the experience of world war. Students will acquire a firmer understanding of U.S. history during this pivotal period and they will develop a research paper on a topic of their choosing, in consultation with the instructor.

Tentative Grade Breakdown/Overview of Assessment:

  • Weekly Reading Journals: 20%
  • Attendance/Participation: 20%
  • Capstone Essay: 60%
  • Four Progress Reports (24% of total)
  • Presentation (3% of total)
  • Final Essay (33% of total)

NOTE: Prior to buying textbooks, students should consult the detailed course outline which will give the final versions of the weekly syllabus and the detailed breakdown of assignments with weighting and due dates.  The course outline will be posted in Moodle (if using) or distributed and discussed on the first day of class.

More information:  http://history.laps.yorku.ca/