General Education

 

Please review the LA&PS General Education Requirements before enrolling.


 

AP/HIST 1030 6.0A: Imperialism and Nationalism in Modern Asia

Course Director: J. Kim, 706 Kaneff Tower, (416)736-2100 x30402, jkim@yorku.ca

Course Calendar Description:
Through examining the broad contours of historical contact and focusing on a series of case studies concerning European imperialism and modern nationalism in Asia, this course introduces students to the primary, secondary, and tertiary sources that form colonial and postcolonial discourses. It also introduces to students historical debates that ground and shape international relations in and on Asia today. Note: LA&PS History majors and minors cannot take this course to satisfy the six credits required at the 1000-level in History for major or minor credit.

Tentative Grade Breakdown/Overview of Assessment: TBA

 

AP/HIST 1095 6.0A: Streetlife: The Culture and History of European Cities

Course Director: S. Brooke, 2188 Vari Hall, (416)736-2100 x66980, sjbrooke@yorku.ca

THIS COURSE WILL BE TAUGHT REMOTELY, SYNCHRONOUSLY AND ASYNCHRONOUSLY

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[VIEW DESCRIPTION OF COURSE DELIVERY]

[VIEW DESCRIPTION OF COURSE CONTENT]

[DOWNLOAD DRAFT SYLLABUS]

Course Calendar Description:
This course uses a diverse range of materials and approaches to examine the development of the modern European city in the contemporary world. It uses cultural sources such as film, photography, literature and music to see how the experience of the modern European city has been represented from the nineteenth century to the present day. The course also uses the history of the modern European city to explore historical issues such as the experience of war, poverty and wealth, social reform, and the growth of cosmopolitanism and multiracialism. It explores the material space of urban development by looking at architecture, urban planning and housing. The course reflects upon current social and political issues in the modern European city, such as gentrification, popular protest and globalization. Though the course will discuss the culture and history of European cities, it focuses upon the examples of Paris and London from the mid nineteenth century to the present day. The course will explore the human experience of modern European cities, including discussions of race, gender, sexuality and class in the modern city, the physical shape of cities, and the cultural representation of city life. Particular topics covered include popular culture from café life to dancehalls; the photography of twentieth-century Paris; cosmopolitanism and the modern city; class conflicts in the city; the city on screen; fashion and postwar Paris and London; and radical movements in the city. Sources include novels such as Therèse Raquin by Emile Zola and Absolute Beginners by Colin MacInnes, the photography of Robert Frank and Roger Mayne and documents on the London Blitz. The emphasis in this course is developing skills such as analytical thinking, reading and writing. Note: History majors and minors cannot take this course to satisfy the six credits required at the 1000-level in History for major or minor.

Method of Course Content Delivery:
Combined synchronous and asynchronous. The course is a Remote course. Lectures will be delivered in real time but will also be recordedand available for asynchronous use. Tutorials will be used to review course content, probably asynchronously.

Tentative Grade Breakdown/Overview of Assessment:

20%: Reading and lecture responses through tutorials
10%: Short analytical essay (4-5 pages)
10%: Short analytical essay (4-5 pages)
10%: Short analytical essay (4-5 pages)
20%: Longer primary source essay (8-10 pages)
10%: Mid-term online exam
20%: Final online exam

AP/HIST 1180 6.0A: Making Money

Course Director: D. Koffman, 757 Kaneff Tower, (416)736-2100 x77395, koffman@yorku.ca

THIS COURSE WILL BE TAUGHT REMOTELY AND ASYNCHRONOUSLY

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[VIEW COURSE VIDEO]

Course Calendar Description:
Explores 12 distinct but interrelated questions about money, that elusive substance with which all of us are preoccupied, but to which few us have brought great amounts of critical intellectual attention. The course examines money from a range of disciplinary perspectives, including anthropology, archaeology, economics, history, literature, political science, psychology, religious studies, and sociology, devoting two weeks to each enduring and apparently simple question. As an introduction to one of the fundamental ideas/substances of human life, the course brings interdisciplinary knowledge, breadth, and a range of scholarly approaches to a particular subject. Note: This course will not fulfill a History majors 1000-level requirement. Note: History Majors and Minors cannot take this course to satisfy the six credits required at the 1000-level in History for major or minor credit.

Mode of Delivery:

This course will be offered remotely and asynchronously. Weekly opportunities for optional synchronous video-conferencing with the instructor and TAs will be available during scheduled class times.

  • Recorded Lectures will be posted to the course Moodle site on Fridays at noon in the week ahead of scheduled class times.
  • Lecture notes will be posted to the course Moodle site along with the lectures.
  • All of the readings for this course will be available, for free, through the York University Library website or online. Links will be provided on the course Moodle site.
  • Assignments will be submitted, graded, and returned electronically.
  • Quizzes and Skill-Builders will be taken on directly on the course Moodle site.

Tentative Grade Breakdown/Overview of Assessment:

FALL TERM:
  1. Childhood Memories of Money 10% - Due late September
  2. Find + Analyze an Image About Money 10% - Due: late October
  3. Responses to Readings and Lectures 8% - Due: 8 out of 12 weeks
  4. Skill Builders 5% - Due: 5 of 6; 1sttutorial of unit
  5. Fall Term Quizzes 12% - Due: 2ndtutorial of each unit
WINTER TERM:
  1. One Unit, In-Depth 10% - Due: late January
  2. Create a Unit 10% - Due: late February
  3. Revise One Prior Assignment 10% - Due: late March
  4. Responses to Readings and Lectures 8% - Due: 8 out of 12 weeks
  5. Skill Builders 5% - Due: 5 of 6; 1sttutorial of unit
  6. Winter Term Quizzes 12% - Due: 2ndtutorial of each unit