3000 Level Courses

 

Please note that 1st year students (0-23 credits) are unable to enroll in 3000-level courses.

AP/HIST 3130 6.0A: The Roman Revolution

(Crosslisted to: AP/CLST 3130 6.00)

Course Director:  R. Wei, ryanwei@yorku.ca

Course Calendar Description: The Roman Revolution. An examination of the political, cultural, economic and social transformation of the Roman state and society during the late Roman republic and early empire.

Tentative Grade Breakdown/Overview of Assessment: TBA

 

AP/HIST 3135 3.0A (FALL): Spectacle and Society in Ancient Rome

(Crosslisted to: AP/CLST 3135 3.00)

Course Director:  J. Edmondson, jedmond@yorku.ca

THIS COURSE WILL BE TAUGHT FULLY ONLINE

[DOWNLOAD DRAFT SYLLABUS]

Course Calendar Description:
This course traces the development of gladiatorial presentations, chariot-races and other public spectacles in Rome, Italy and the Roman Empire from 200 BC to 400 AD. It concentrates in particular on their changing nature, scale and socio-cultural function.

Method of Course Delivery:
This course will be offered as a fully online course. The lectures will be pre-recorded in short segments and accessible via the course Moodle site, and all assignment guidelines and key information will be posted there weekly. Students will have the opportunity for scheduled, real-time meetings with Professor Edmondson for discussion and feedback at 2.30 p.m. on Thursdays, but these sessions will not be mandatory. All course components will be completed online

Tentative Grade Breakdown/Overview of Assessment:

  • Online Academic Integrity Tutorial - Due 1 Oct., 11.59 p.m.:  0% (but required)
  • Primary source analysis - Due 22 Oct., 11.59 p.m.:  15%
  • Major paper - Due 26 Nov., 11.59 p.m.:  40%
  • Short Quizzes 1 per module (due by 11.59 p.m. on the last day of the module): 10%
  • Short Reading Responses 1 per module (due by 11.59 p.m. on the last day of the module): 10%
  • Final Examination In the December exam period (9-23 Dec.). Questions will be released at 9.00 a.m. on Mon. 14 Dec. and will due by upload to the Moodle site by 11.59 p.m. on Sat. 19 Dec.:  25%

 

 

AP/HIST 3154 3.0M (WINTER): Egypt from Alexander to Cleopatra

(Crosslisted to: AP/CLST 3154 3.00)

Course Director:  B. Kelly, benkelly@yorku.ca

Course Calendar Description: Examines the social and cultural history of Ptolemaic Egypt from the Macedonian occupation in 332 BC to the death of Cleopatra VII in 30 BC.

Tentative Grade Breakdown/Overview of Assessment: TBA

AP/HIST 3180 6.0A: The Rise and Fall of the Sassanian Empire, 224-642

Course Director:  T. Abdullah, athabit@yorku.ca

Course Calendar Description:  The course will cover the origins of the Sassanians of Iran, their rise and domination of the Middle East, and their subsequent defeat and fall at the hands of the Arab Muslims.

Tentative Grade Breakdown/Overview of Assessment: TBA

AP/HIST 3326 3.0A (FALL): Europe's Ottoman History, 1400s -1912

THIS COURSE WILL BE TAUGHT FULLY ONLINE

Course Director:  A. Gekas, 2120 Vari Hall, (416)736-2100 x30423, agekas@yorku.ca 

[DOWNLOAD DRAFT SYLLABUS]

Course Calendar Description:  This course analyzes the history of Ottoman influence on the European regions of the Ottoman Empire and explores the impact of Ottomans on European histories, economies and societies in the Balkans and the Eastern Mediterranean. We will look at the interactions between Ottomans and Europeans and the lasting legacies of Ottoman rule on commerce, religion, architecture, food and music.

Expanded Course Description:
This course analyzes the history of European regions of the Ottoman Empire from the time Ottoman appeared in ‘Europe’ in the fourteenth century until the end of the Empire (1922). The course will explore how the idea of Europe changed over time, to a large extent because interaction and exchange with the Ottoman Empire. The course also explores the impact of Ottomans on European histories, economies and societies in the Balkans, South East Europe and the Mediterranean and the lasting legacies of Ottoman rule on commerce, religion, architecture, food and music. The Ottoman Empire was one of the longest lasting and most territorially extensive of all empires in history.

Method of Course DeliveryThe course will be delivered online through pre-recorded lectures. The lectures will amount to approximately an hour per week and will be divided into three short videos of approximately 20 minutes each. These videos will be posted on the course Moodle site and will be available for you to access each week together with all other course material.

Tentative Grade Breakdown/Overview of Assessment:
Participation and Forum five reading posts:  20%
Book Review:  20%
Essay 1: 30%
Essay 2: 30%

AP/HIST 3356 3.0A (FALL): Greeks in the World. A history of Greek migration and diaspora in the 20th Century

THIS COURSE WILL BE TAUGHT IN A BLENDED MODE; LECTURES RECORDED, TUTORIALS IN REAL TIME 

Course Director:  A. Gekas, 2120 Vari Hall, (416)736-2100 x30423, agekas@yorku.ca 

[DOWNLOAD DRAFT SYLLABUS]

Course Calendar Description: Examines the history of migration from Greece to North America, Australia and Europe in the 19th and 20th centuries and combines a detailed historical narrative on the development of Greek diaspora with a more in-depth examination of specific communities. It also introduces students to the field of Diaspora and migration studies. Previously offered as: AP/HIST 3356 6.00.

Expanded Course Description:  This course examines the history of migration from Greece to North America, Australia and Europe from the end of the nineteenth to the end of the twentieth century using case studies, concepts and theories of migration. Students will discuss in the online forum and in their essays: the causes and conditions of migration and the migration experience, the shifts in the study of migration history from socio-economic factors to the history of individuals; the economic conditions and state policies in Greece and the various destination countries; the creation of immigrant communities, the role of the Church, politics and relations with other immigrant groups. The course will draw comparisons with immigrant groups whose experience resembles the Greek one. Specific topics include: gendered migration and ‘picture brides’, repatriation and relations with Greece as homeland, racism and assimilation, anti-Greek riots and their consequences.

Method of Course Delivery:  The course will be delivered online through pre-recorded lectures. The lectures will amount to approximately an hour per week and will be divided into three short videos of approximately 20 minutes each. These videos will be posted on the course Moodle site and will be available for you to access each week together with all other course material.

Tentative Grade Breakdown/Overview of Assessment:
Participation and Forum five reading posts: 20%
Book Review: 20%
Essay: 30%
Take-home exam or podcast: 30%

AP/HIST 3381 3.0M (WINTER): Eastern Europe, Since 1918

Course Director:  K. Weiser, kweiser@yorku.ca

Course Calendar Description: The "Successor States"; their interwar problems and successes; evolution during the Second World War; four decades of Communist rule; return to diversity in the 1990s.

Tentative Grade Breakdown/Overview of Assessment: TBA

 

AP/HIST 3392 3.0A (FALL): The Spanish Civil War

THIS COURSE WILL BE TAUGHT FULLY ONLINE

Course Director:  B. Molas, bmolas@yorku.ca

[DOWNLOAD DRAFT SYLLABUS]

Course Calendar Description: While examining the causes and nature of the Spanish Civil War, this course also considers the place of the conflict in European politics and culture.

Expanded Course Description:
This online course will focus on the Spanish Civil War (1936-1939), exploring the national and international socio-political factors that shaped it. The course is roughly divided into three main sections: the events preceding and/or leading up to the conflict, including the Primo de Rivera Dictatorship; the course of the war, which will pay particular attention to the different historical actors and groups that participated in the conflict; and the historical memory, which will discuss how the Spanish Civil War is remembered and why. We will further explore these themes through readings, images, and films, and discuss them on a regular basis through short weekly assignments.

Method of Course Delivery:  These guidelines are tentative, but any changes are expected to be minor.

The course will be delivered online through pre-recorded lectures. The lectures will amount to approximately an hour per week and will be split into three short videos of roughly 20 minutes each. These videos will be posted on the course Moodle site and will be available for you to access each week.

Unless stated differently, every week students will be given a source to discuss in 1 to 2 pages (400-600 words) due the following week. These weekly assignments will be used to measure attendance and participation. Indications on how to discuss a source will be posted on the Moodle site as ‘How To’ 10-minute videos on Week 1.

A video might include one quiz question half-way through it. If so, students must include their brief answer (100 words) to that question when submitting their weekly discussion. The answer must be under a separate section entitled “Quiz Question”. This section must include both the question and the answer.

At the end of the semester, students will have to submit a final presentation (10-15 minutes) OR essay (2,500-3,500 words) on one aspect of the Spanish Civil War that has not been discussed in the video lectures or that has been approached differently.

Tentative Grade Breakdown/Overview of Assessment:
Weekly Discussion Papers: 60% (6% per paper)
Quiz Questions: 10%
Final Presentation OR Essay: 30%

AP/HIST 3520 3.0A (FALL): History of Quebec Since 1867

THIS COURSE WILL BE TAUGHT FULLY ONLINE, ASYNCHRONOUSLY

Course Director:  M. Martel, mmartel@yorku.ca

[VIEW TRAILER]

[DOWNLOAD DRAFT SYLLABUS]

Course Calendar Description: This course analyses the development of Quebec since Confederation. It looks at the cultural, economic, ideological, political, and social factors that have shaped Quebec society since 1867. Course credit exclusions: None.

Tentative Grade Breakdown/Overview of Assessment:
Written Assignment 1 (analysis of a feature-length film):  15%                                      Written Assignment 2 (a summary of Quebec History for a travel guide book): 35%
Quizzes:  15%
Final Exam:  20%
Contribution to discussions:  15

 

AP/HIST 3535 6.0A: African-Canadian History

Course Director: TBA

Course Calendar Description: Examines the history of African-Canadians from colonial contact in the 17th century through to the post-Second World War migrations from Africa and the Caribbean.

Tentative Grade Breakdown/Overview of Assessment: TBA

AP/HIST 3580 6.0A: 20th-Century Canada

HIST 3580 is being offered as a mixed remote course for the duration of the COVID-19 pandemic. Lecture recordings will be asynchronous, posted to the course website on Moodle; synchronous tutorials/enhanced course drop-ins will be held on Zoom at regularly scheduled meeting times.

Course Director: J. Stephen, stephenj@yorku.ca

[DOWNLOAD DRAFT SYLLABUS]

Course Calendar Description: An analysis of the major events and developments affecting Canadian society during the past hundred years, including political and constitutional evolution, economic and social change and alterations in the climate of ideas.

Tentative Grade Breakdown/Overview of Assessment:
Reading responses:  20%
Essay 1:  20%
Essay 2 Outline:  pass/fail
Essay 2:  20%
Final examination:  25%
Participation:  15%

AP/HIST 3601 6.0A: Indigenous and Colonial American History to 1776

THIS COURSE WILL BE TAUGHT FULLY ONLINE

Course Director: TBA

Course Calendar Description:  Analyzes change and continuity in indigenous and colonial America, beginning with indigenous cultures before the European invasions, tracing the rise of British, French, and Spanish colonies in North America, focusing on the emergence and expansion of African American slavery, and concluding with the Declaration of Independence and the establishment of the United States in 1776. Course credit exclusions: None.

Tentative Grade Breakdown/Overview of Assessment: TBA

 

AP/HIST 3618 3.0A (FALL): United States Since 1945

Course Director:  M. Ladd-Taylor, mltaylor@yorku.ca

[DOWNLOAD DRAFT SYLLABUS]

THIS COURSE WILL BE TAUGHT ONLINE WITH A SYNCHRONOUS OPTION

Course Calendar Description: This course examines the conflicts and contradictions of American politics, culture, and society since the end of World War II. Through popular culture, journalism and political sources, we explore how social movements like civil rights, feminism, and the religious right changed the United States and probe the relationship between America's global military and economic power and ordinary people's lives. This course is open to students who have successfully completed 24 credits.

Method of Course Delivery:

Scheduled Meeting Time: You may take this course entirely asynchronously and online, but you may attend weekly discussions on Zoom if you wish. These real-time sessions on Zoom will be scheduled during our assigned class time, 2:30-4:00pm EST.*

Lectures: Lectures will be pre-recorded and posted on the HIST 3618 Moodle site so you can watch them at your convenience.

* Class is scheduled for 2:30-5:00pm Eastern Time. Within that timeframe, we can adjust the course schedule IF students vote to do so. You may also take the entire course asynchronously and online.

Tentative Grade Breakdown/Overview of Assessment:
Participation (Weekly Zoom workshops or Moodle discussion forum):  20%
4 Quizzes (US Constitution/map & at end of each module):  20%
Song of the Week Presentation:  15%
Op-Ed on the Legacy of James Baldwin, due Oct. 21:  20%
Final essay (documentary critique, due Dec. 9):  25%

AP/HIST 3645 3.0 (WINTER): Post-World War II U.S. Political Movements

THIS COURSE WILL BE TAUGHT FULLY ONLINE

Course Director: TBA

Course Calendar Description:  This course analyzes major political movements that have transformed the United States. The course focuses on African American, women's, and lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender movements.

AP/HIST 3710 3.0A (FALL): Reconstructing Society in the Post Slavery Caribbean

THIS COURSE WILL BE TAUGHT FULLY ONLINE AND ASYNCHRONOUSLY

Course Director: D. Trotman, dtrotman@yorku.ca

[VIEW COURSE TRAILER]

Course Calendar Description: Examines the patterns of continuity and change in the institutions of post slavery Caribbean societies. The emphasis is on the processes of social re-engineering and cultural creation in the aftermath of nineteenth century slave emancipation and twentieth century revolution.

Expanded Course Description:  What happens after Slavery in the Caribbean? How is freedom defined and a society based on human freedom created in the aftermath of centuries of slavery?  How does this impact on the contemporary Caribbean?

These are the questions which guide our intellectual inquiries in this course. HIST 3710 looks at three case studies - Haiti, The Anglo-Caribbean and Cuba - to examine the struggles waged by the emancipated to make freedom a reality and to create new lives for themselves.

Tentative Grade Breakdown/Overview of Assessment:
Participation in the Online Forum (30%)
Reading Responses (30%)
Essay (40%)

 

AP/HIST 3732 3.0M (WINTER): Contemporary Mexican History, 1940-2000

Course Director: A. Rubenstein, arubenst@yorku.ca

Course Calendar Description: Examines the post-Revolutionary period in Mexico. Through a study of a period of single-party rule, this course emphasizes rapid demographic, economic, social and cultural change in a time of apparent political stasis.

Tentative Grade Breakdown/Overview of Assessment: TBA

AP/HIST 3733 3.0A (FALL): The Spanish Conquest of Mexico

THIS COURSE WILL BE TAUGHT REMOTELY, SYNCHRONOUSLY AND ASYNCHRONOUSLY

Course Director: A. Durston, durston@yorku.ca

[DOWNLOAD DRAFT SYLLABUS]

Course Calendar Description: This course examines the Spanish conquest of Mexico using translated historical documents, and analyzes changing understandings of what was involved in the European invasion of the Americas.

Expanded Course Description:  The Spanish invasion of the Aztec Empire in 1519 is one of the most dramatic events in world history, and one that had profound consequences for the Americas and the world as a whole. It has long been imagined as a spectacular feat in which a few hundred Europeans swiftly subjugated millions of indigenous people, but historians no longer accept this portrayal of what happened.

This course examines who the opposing sides were (with special attention to the Aztecs) and what sort of conquest was achieved by the Spanish. As well as discussing how the participants and their immediate descendants narrated the conquest, we will see how and why the interpretations of modern historians have changed profoundly, and continue to change.

Method of Course Content Delivery:  There will be no in-person interactions or activities on campus. Some components may be pre-recorded and posted on Moodle, but some real-time learning activities will take place at the scheduled course time (Tuesday 2:30-5:30).

Tentative Grade Breakdown/Overview of Assessment:
Participation (includes online reading log): 20%
Quizzes: 10%
Reading responses/primary source analyses: 40%
Take-home exam: 30%

AP/HIST 3761 3.0M (WINTER): Modern Japan: Meiji Restoration to Postwar Era (1868-Present)

THIS COURSE WILL BE TAUGHT ASYNCHRONOUSLY

Course Director: J. Fogel, fogel@yorku.ca

Course Calendar Description: This course concerns modern Japan from the Meiji Restoration of 1867-1868, its relations with Europe, the Americas, and its East Asian neighbors on its tumultuous path to the Second World War, as well as its postwar efforts towards reconstruction and resurgence. It examines the historical underpinnings of Japan as we see it today-economy, society, culture, politics, its successes and failures. In a mere 150 years, Japan transformed itself from a feudal, decentralized regime into a highly centralized, internationally respected capitalist government and economy. We evaluate that history as reflected in society, the economy, cultural, politics, and international relations. Course credit exclusion: AP/HIST 3760 6.00.

Tentative Grade Breakdown/Overview of Assessment:
Paper and Final (each worth 50%)

AP/HIST 3780 6.0A: Themes in African History

Course Director: P. Lovejoy, plovejoy@yorku.ca

Course Calendar Description: This course explores major issues in African history over the past 500 years. These include the rise and fall of kingdoms; relations with Europe and Asia; 19th-century revolutions; colonial administration; decolonization; and the search for economic and political stability post-independence. Course credit exclusions: None. Prior TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusions: AK/HIST 3100Q 6.00 (prior to Fall/Winter 2000-2001) and AK/HIST 3970 6.00.

Tentative Grade Breakdown/Overview of Assessment: TBA

AP/HIST 3781 3.0M (WINTER): African Civilizations before Colonialism

Course Director: P. Lovejoy, plovejoy@yorku.ca

Course Calendar Description: Explores the rise and fall of African Civilizations before the advent of formal European colonialism in the late nineteenth century. By emphasizing the "African Genious" in the making (and unmaking) of complex societies throughout the continent over millennia so as to dispel ahistorical notions of the so-called "dark continent".

Tentative Grade Breakdown/Overview of Assessment: TBA

AP/HIST 3792 6.0M (WINTER): The Middle East Since 1800

Course Director: L. Pourtavaf, lpourtav@yorku.ca

Course Calendar Description: This course surveys the main political events, social institutions, cultural and economic developments, as well as various aspects of everyday life in the Middle East from 1800 to the present. Course credit exclusion: AP/POLS 3260 6.00. PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusions: AK/HIST 3920 6.00, AS/HIST 3792 6.00.

Tentative Grade Breakdown/Overview of Assessment: TBA

AP/HIST 3793 3.0M (WINTER): Jerusalem: Sacred City, Contested City

(Crosslisted to: AP/HUMA 3843 3.00 but offered by AP/HIST in FW20)

Course Director: C. Ehrlich, ehrlich@yorku.ca

Course Calendar Description:  Since antiquity, Jerusalem has been a focal point for both spiritual transcendence and earthly strife. This course explores the history of a city holy to three major Western religions. It focuses on the political and religious factors that have shaped its changing meaning for Jews, Christians, and Muslims and the controversies that surround it to this day.

Tentative Grade Breakdown/Overview of Assessment: TBA

 

AP/HIST 3835 3.0M (WINTER): Dressing Up: Fashion, Identity and Resistance in Twentieth Century North America

Course Director: K. McPherson, kathryn@yorku.ca

Course Calendar Description: This course explores how fashion, costumes and uniforms emerged as sites of identity formation and resistance to social norms in twentieth century North America. The course explores social movements such as early twentieth-century women's dress reform, the Zoot-suit riots of the 1940s, "hippies" and 1960s counter-culture, drag performances as sites of queer and trans activism, and hip-hop fashion as anti-racist activism.

Tentative Grade Breakdown/Overview of Assessment: TBA

AP/HIST 3838 6.0A: Social History of Modern Sport, 1850-2000

Course Director: K. McPherson, kathryn@yorku.ca

THIS COURSE WILL BE TAUGHT REMOTELY IN A FLEXIBLE FORMAT

[DOWNLOAD DRAFT SYLLABUS]

Course Calendar Description:  Examines the social history of sport in urban, industrial economies from 1850 to the present. It explores how gender, race, class, sexuality and ability have influenced people's experiences with sport, and considers how sport has been used to express values like nationalism and imperialism, while also being used to promote social change and human rights.

Tentative Grade Breakdown/Overview of Assessment:

Comparative Analysis: 15%
Primary Document Analysis: 10%
Research Paper: 20%
First Term Test: 15%
Final Examination: 20%
Participation – on-line posts and extemporaneous speaking: 20%

AP/HIST 3843 3.0A (FALL): Occupation, Collaboration and Death: A Social and Military History of the Second World War to 1944

THIS COURSE WILL BE TAUGHT ONLINE, with all lectures, information, assignment guidelines, discussions and important information posted on the class moodle site. For students who are interested, the Professor will host live office hours/discussion on Thursdays between 10:30-11:30 via zoom, but attendance at the live sessions is not mandatory.

Course Director:  D. Neill, dneill@yorku.ca

[VIEW COURSE TRAILER]

[DOWNLOAD DRAFT SYLLABUS]

Course Calendar Description:  This course provides a global history of the Second World War. It begins in 1937 with the Japanese invasion of mainland China and ends in 1944 with the invasion of northern Europe (D-Day). The course examines how, in occupied and unoccupied regions, the war affected ordinary peoples' lives. Attention is on collaboration with the enemy and the killing of civilians.

Expanded Course Description:  We begin in the 1930s with the Japanese invasion of mainland China and the Spanish Civil War, and from there explore the conditions leading to Germany’s invasion of Poland in 1939. The rest of the course explores the war globally to 1944, with the goal of not only understanding the major military battles, but also how, in occupied and unoccupied regions, the war affected ordinary lives. We will study events in East Asia, Southeast Asia, Europe, the Soviet Union, the Arab world, Africa, the Caribbean, and North America. Among the topics we discuss are fascism and Nazism, Japanese imperialism, the growth of liberation movements, the mobilization and organization of wartime societies, the Holocaust, mass aerial bombings, and other acts of violence. We also explore resistance and collaboration in occupied territories. We will rely on a rich variety of sources including memoirs, diaries, letters films, novels and many secondary sources.

Tentative Grade Breakdown/Overview of Assessment:
Participation written submissions (based on weekly questions): 20%
Book review: Willy Reese:  10%
Essay  (6-9 pages, or about 2,250 words):  25%
Short Answer pieces (2):  15%
Final Exam (online):  30%

 

AP/HIST 3844 3.0M (WINTER): Liberation, Violence, and Reconstruction: A History of the Second World War and its Aftermath, 1944-1949

Course Director: D. Neill, dneill@yorku.ca

Course Calendar Description: This course provides a global history of the Second World War from 1944 and its aftermath. The course begins in June 1944 with D-Day and ends in 1949 with the Communist Party's military victory in China. It examines how liberation resulted in violence, war crimes trials, and reconstruction of those communities the war had affected.

Tentative Grade Breakdown/Overview of Assessment: TBA

AP/HIST 3850 6.0A: Murder and Other Crimes: Law and Justice in 19th and 20th Century North America

Course Director: W. Wicken, 2192 Vari Hall, (416)736-2100 x66963, wwicken@yorku.ca

[DOWNLOAD DRAFT SYLLABUS]

[VIEW COURSE TRAILER]

THIS COURSE WILL BE TAUGHT REMOTELY

Course Calendar Description: Examines the Canadian and American criminal justice systems from the mid-19th through late 20th century. The course focuses on important trials - such as Lizzie Borden (1892), the ""Scottsboro Boys"" (1931), and Steven Truscott (1959) - and how our explanations of these crimes are shaped by factors such as politics and the popular press, racial stereotypes, and contemporary understandings of gender and class. The course also looks at the role of the legal system, particularly the Supreme Court, showing both how the criminal law was applied in murder trials, as well as how these cases often resulted in changing interpretations of the law, and new developments in our understandings of civil rights.

  • Taught Remotely
  • Audio Lectures with Powerpoint Slides to be posted on Monday before the Friday Lecture
  • Zoom Meetings with all students at 11:30 on Friday
  • This format will continue probably until the end of the Fall Term.

Tentative Grade Breakdown/Overview of Assessment:

  • Posts/quizzes based on readings and lectures: 20%
  • First Term Assignments: 25%
  • December Exam: 15%
  • Second Term Assignments: 25%
  • Final Exam: 15%

AP/HIST 3990 3.0 & AP/HIST 3990 6.0: Supervised Reading and Research

Course Calendar Description: Supervised reading and research course. It is normally open only to undergraduate history majors of exceptional ability. Prospective candidates must submit in advance a written application for approval to the departmental Chair or undergraduate director. For more information regarding the application criteria, please contact the department. Note: For Faculty regulations on independent study courses, please consult the Faculty of Arts Independent Reading Courses section of this calendar.