General Education Courses

Note: General Education Courses cannot be used to satisfy our History Major Requirements

The Faculty of Liberal Arts and Professional Studies general education curriculum provides students with the foundation of interdisciplinary knowledge, breadth, methods and the approaches necessary for successful liberal arts and professional education.

General Education courses approved for credit expose students to ways of knowing and fundamental ideas spanning the humanities, natural sciences and social sciences.  These courses also provide explicit instruction in critical analytical skills and thought and its communication in writing and speech.

Course:

AP/HIST 1095 6.0A: Streetlife: The Culture and History of European Cities

Lecture: T 8:30-10:30
Tutorials: T 10:30-11:30; T 10:30-11:30; T 10:30-11:30; T 11:30-12:30; T 11:30-12:30; T 11:30-12:30

This course uses a diverse range of materials and approaches to examine the development of the modern European city in the contemporary world. It uses cultural sources such as film, photography, literature and music to see how the experience of the modern European city has been represented from the nineteenth century to the present day. The course also uses the history of the modern European city to explore historical issues such as the experience of war, poverty and wealth, social reform, and the growth of cosmopolitanism and multiracialism. It explores the material space of urban development by looking at architecture, urban planning and housing. The course reflects upon current social and political issues in the modern European city, such as gentrification, popular protest and globalization. Though the course will discuss the culture and history of European cities, it focuses upon the examples of Paris and London from the mid nineteenth century to the present day. The course will explore the human experience of modern European cities, including discussions of race, gender, sexuality and class in the modern city, the physical shape of cities, and the cultural representation of city life. Particular topics covered include popular culture from café life to dancehalls; the photography of twentieth-century Paris; cosmopolitanism and the modern city; class conflicts in the city; the impact of total war on the city; the city on screen; fashion and postwar Paris and London; and radical movements in the city. Sources include novels such as Therèse Raquin by Emile Zola and Absolute Beginners by Colin MacInnes, the photography of Charles Marville, Lee Miller and Roger Mayne and documents on the London Blitz. The emphasis in this course is developing skills such as analytical thinking, reading and writing.

Note: This course will not fulfill a History major’s 1000 level requirement.

Note: This course has been approved in the Faculty of Liberal Arts & Professional Studies for general education credit (Humanities).

Course credit exclusions: None

Grade Breakdown: TBA

Maximum Enrolment: 150

Course Director: S. Brooke, 2188 Vari Hall, 416-736-2100, ext. 66980

AP/HIST 1100 6.0A: Gladiators, Gods, Gigolos, and Goths: Reading the Roman Society, c. 200 BCE-c.500 CE

View course video

Lecture: W 12:30-14:30
Tutorials: W 14:30-15:30; W 14:30-15:30; W 14:30-15:30; W 15:30-16:30; W 15:30-16:30; W 15:30-16:30

Through a series of case studies concerning the social history of ancient Rome, this course introduces students to the written texts and other media that are used to understand human societies of all periods. Case studies include gladiatorial games and spectacles, Roman religion, Roman sexualities, slavery, and the Germanic invasions leading to the fall of the western Roman empire. Special emphasis will be given to the diverse interpretative approaches that one can bring to such texts and artefacts.

Note: This course will not fulfill a History major’s 1000 level requirement.

Note: This course has been approved in the Faculty of Liberal Arts & Professional Studies for general education credit.

Course credit exclusion: None

Grade Breakdown: TBA

Maximum Enrolment: 150

Course Director: B. Kelly, 2190 Vari Hall, 416-736-2100, ext. 30415

AP/HIST 1180 6.0A: Making Money

Lecture: R 14:30-16:30
Tutorial: R 16:30-17:30; R 16:30-17:30; R 16:30-17:30; R 17:30-18:30; R 17:30-18:30; R 17:30-18:30

How and why is money meaningful?

This course examines money, the "stuff" with which all of us are preoccupied, but about which few have spent much time thinking critically. The year of learning is broken up into two-week units, each of which asks a deceptively simple question, like "Why did money begin?", "Does God hate money?", "Is a gift ever free?", "When did time become money?", "Can money be beautiful?", "More money, more happiness?", and "Is digital money safe?" In order to answer these questions, the course draws on readings from a variety of print media and scholarly fields, as well as film clips, music lyrics, sources from far and wide, past and present, and a guest professor (every other week) from York University's esteemed faculty in anthropology, archaeology, art, communications, history, law, literature, philosophy, psychology, religious studies, sociology, and more, thereby exposing students to a range of ways that scholars ask and answer questions.

As an introduction to one of the core substances of human life, the course conveys the powerful and mind-bending notion that money is not a single “thing” but a construct that changes enormously over time, across cultures, and on account of the questions we ask about it. It explores a set of dazzling issues, problems, and themes from the dawn of human life to the digital age, including the tensions between risk & reward, freedom & security, individuals & systems, power & value. The course also aims to develop some of the skills that are necessary for successful university careers: critical thinking, engaged reading, clear speech, and professional writing. No calculators necessary.

Note: This course will not fulfill a History majors 1000 level requirement

Note: This course has been approved in the Faculty of Liberal Arts & Professional Studies for general education credit: HUMANITIES

Course credit exclusion: None

Grade Breakdown:

Fall Term:

  1. Childhood Memories (Due: September 24) - 10%
  2. Song Lyrics (Due: October 22) - 10%
  3. One Unit, In-Depth (Due: November 19) - 10%
  4. Participation (Due: on-going) - 10%
  5. Mid-Term Exam (Due: TBA, during exam period) - 10%

Winter Term:

6. Ted Talk or Planet Money (Due: January 21) - 10%
7. 3 Units, In Common (Due: February 11) - 10%
8. Create A Unit (Due: March 10) - 10%
9. Participation (Due: on-going) - 10%
10. Final Exam (Due: TBA, during exam period) - 10%

Maximum Enrolment: 150

Course Director: D. Koffman, 757 Kaneff Tower, 416-736-2100, ext. 77395


For a full list of LA&PS General Education Courses, please refer to: LA&PS General Education Courses