4000 Level

Important General Information - New as of FW 12-13*

Beginning FW 2012-13, there is a new system for enrolling in 4000-level history courses.  Honours History Majors and Minors can use the online enrolment system to register for 4000-level courses IF you have successfully completed at least 84 credits and the course(s) listed in the calendar as prerequisites for the desired course.

If you want to take a 4000-level history course but do not meet the specific requirements for online enrolment, or if you are unable to enrol for any other reason, please contact the Director of Undergraduate Studies for permission.

The new enrolment procedures apply to both types of 4000-level history courses:  “seminars” and “colloquia”.

Seminars are relatively small (usually with a maximum of 18 students) and have a major research component.  Colloquia are somewhat larger classes (usually with a maximum of 30 students). All History Honours Majors must take at least two 4000-level history courses, one of which must be a seminar.  Specialized Honours History Majors must take three 4000-level history courses, two of which must be seminars (and one of which must deal with history outside the U.S. and Canada).  Two History Minors may take either a seminar or a colloquium.  

Please note seminars are not offered in the summer. 

  1. Seminars generally include HIST 4100-4899 and 4000-level History courses in other academic units at York (e.g. Glendon) that have planned enrolments of fewer than 20 students.  (HIST 4000 and HIST4991 are considered seminars for major requirement purposes. For details, please refer to the Supplemental Calendar.)  As 4000-level seminars are not offered during the summer, history majors should plan to do their seminars during the Fall/Winter Terms
  2. Colloquia generally include HIST 4010-4089, 4990, and 4000-level History courses in other academic units at York (i.e. Glendon) that have planned enrolments of 20 or more students.  One or more colloquia may be offered during the summer.

Fourth year courses taken at other universities, if acceptable, will normally be counted as colloquia.  For such a course to be credited as a seminar (by this Department’s definition), a student must bring documentation of its class size and major research component to be examined by the Director of Undergraduate Studies.

It is the student’s responsibility to make sure you have completed the 4000-level seminars and /or colloquia required for your History Major.

Unless otherwise noted, all classes meet during the first week of classes.  (Note: “R” stands for Thursday.)

AP/HIST 4010 6.0A: Colloquium in Ancient Greek and Roman History

Seminar: F 11:30-14:30

Advanced colloquium on selected topics in Ancient Greek and/or Roman History. Topics vary from year to year. Please consult the Department of History supplemental calendar for further details.

Priority is given to History, Classical Studies or Hellenic Studies Honours majors and minors who have successfully completed at least 84 credits.

Prerequisites: AP/HIST 2100 6.00 or AP/HUMA 3100 6.00 or AP/HUMA 3102 3.00 or AP/HUMA 3104 6.00 or AP/HUMA 3105 6.00 or AP/HUMA 3110 6.00 and AP/HIST 3120 6.00 or AP/HIST 3125 3.00 or AP/HIST 3130 6.00 or AP/HIST 3131 6.00 or AP/HIST 3135 3.00 or AP/HIST 3140 3.00 or AP/HIST 3150 6.00 or AP/HIST 3152 6.00 or AP/HIST 3153 6.00 or AP/HIST 3154 3.00 or AP/HIST 3160 6.00 or departmental permission.

Course credit exclusion: AS/HIST 4010 6.00.

Grade Breakdown: TBA

Maximum Enrolment: 18

Course Director: TBA

AP/HIST 4012 3.0M (Winter): Colloquium in Roman Social History

**Day/time tentative**

Seminar: TR 13:00- 14:30

The course focuses on one or more key topics to deepen students’ understanding of key concepts, methodologies and theoretical approaches in Roman social history. Topics vary from year to year, but may include: family and household; law and society; class, status, and social hierarchies; army and society; demography; work and labour; mobility and connectivity.

Priority is given to History or Classical Studies Honours majors and minors who have successfully completed at least 84 credits.

Prerequisites: AP/HIST 2100 6.0 or 3130 6.0 or 3131 6.0 or 3135 3.0 or 3136 6.0 or 3140 3.0 or 3154 3.0 or 3155 3.0 or 3160 6.0 or 4010 6.0 or 4122 6.0 or 4130 6.0 or 4140 6.0 or 4160 6.0 or AP/HUMA 2105 6.0 or 3103 6.0 or 3104 3.0 or 3105 6.0 or 4102 6.0 or 4107 6.0
Course Credit Exclusion: None

Grade Breakdown: TBA

Maximum Enrolment: 30

Course Director: J. Bermejo Tirado, 2162 Vari Hall, 416-736-5123

AP/HIST 4030 6.0A: Europe Between the Wars, 1918-1939

Lecture: W 16:00-19:00

This course examines cultural movements, political ideologies, economic and urban development, class conflict, and imperialism in Europe’s interwar period, studied in transnational and global perspective wherever possible.

Priority is given to History or European Studies Honours majors and minors who have successfully completed at least 84 credits.

Course Credit Exclusions: Course credit exclusion: AP/HIST 4360 6.00.
PRIOR TO FALL 2009: AS/HIST 4030 6.00, AS/HIST 4360 6.00.

Grade Breakdown: None

Maximum enrollment: 30

Course Director: A. Yates, 2134 Vari Hall, 416-736-2100, ext. 66970

AP/HIST 4061 6.0A: Race and Politics in America Since the Second World War

Lecture: T 11:30-14:30

This course has two objectives: to evaluate the strategies African-Americans have employed to exert political power since World War II and to explore the extent to which African-American life has improved since the Civil Rights revolution of the 1960s. .

With regard to the first concern, the course will explore such political options as: non-violent direct action (as seen in the Montgomery bus boycott, the sit-in movement, and the Freedom Rides), black nationalism and separatism (as exemplified by Malcolm X and the Black Muslims, the Black Power movement of the late 1960s, and the Black Panther Party), the pursuit of rights through the legal system (as seen in Brown vs. the Board of Education in 1954 and many other Supreme Court decisions), participation in “conventional politics” (evident long before Obama in such phenomena as Jesse Jackson’s two presidential campaigns), and engagement in cultural production and cultural criticism (as practiced by activists such as bell hooks and Cornel West). In analyzing these varied forms of politics, our concern will be to assess which way(s) of attacking America’s ‘race problem’ have proven most productive.

Unfortunately, notwithstanding the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the Voting Rights Act of 1965, African Americans have continued to encounter greater difficulties than other Americans in dealing with the criminal justice system, in pursuing education, in seeking employment, and in avoiding poverty and welfare. The second half of the course will contemplate competing explanations for why this is so. It will also investigate the effect government policies such as affirmative action, the War on Poverty, and Black Focus schooling have had on African-American opportunities and reflect on what new policies would seem most likely to improve the situation at this point.

It is crucial that students interested in taking Hist 4061 understand how the course will function. Weekly readings—generally in the range of 100-125 pages—will constitute the main focus of the course. To “encourage” you to master these readings before you come to class, a challenging fifteen minute quiz will be administered at the start of each class meeting. These quizzes, which will be “open book,” will not test your recall but whether you have thoroughly understood the week’s readings and can “play with” the knowledge involved. For example, you might be asked to summarize an author’s argument or speculate on what one author might say regarding the position taken by another. In truth, to do well on the quizzes, and they will count for 40% of your grade, you simply must have the time and inclination to engage in close reading of the assigned texts before class. (There will be 23 reading quizzes over the year. Your overall quiz mark will be based on your 18 best quizzes. Thus, in effect you will be allowed 5 “misses” over the course of the year.)

In addition to the quizzes, you will also be asked to write two papers, one each term. Your final grade will also include a modest participation component.

Priority is given to History or Social & Political Thought Honours majors and minors who have successfully completed at least 84 credits

Course Credit Exclusion: AP/HIST 4690 6.00.
PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusions: AS/HIST 4061 6.00, AS/HIST 4690 6.00.

Grade Breakdown:

  • Weekly reading quizzes - 40%
  • First term paper - 20%
  • Second term paper - 25%
  • Participation - 15%

Maximum Enrolment: 30

Course Director: J. Ginsburg, 238 McLaughlin College, 416-736-2100, 77086

AP/HIST 4100 6.0A: Selected Problems in Israelite History

Seminar: M 11:30-14:30

This seminar focuses on all primary written sources pertaining directly to Israel from its first appearance until the about 580 B.C.E. The Bible will play a secondary role in this course. We shall read extensively from the non-Biblical writings and ask, eventually: “Can a history of Israel be written without the Bible?”

The major essay will be the writing of such a history

This course is restricted to History, Classical Studies, Jewish Studies or Religious Studies Honours majors and minors who have successfully completed at least 84 credits.

Prerequisites: AP/HIST 2110 6.0 or AP/HIST 3100 6.0 or AP/HIST 3110 6.0

Course Credit Exclusion: Prior TO FALL 2009: AS/HIST 4100 6.00.

Books To Be Purchased
Tanakh (=NJPS translation of the Hebrew Bible)
A collection of translations of primary sources.

Grade Breakdown:

  • Class preparation & participation - 10%
  • Oral reports - 25%
  • Minor written assignments - 25%
  • Major essay - 40%

Maximum Enrolment: 18

Course Director: M. Maidman, 2164 Vari Hall, 416-736-2100, ext. 30430

AP/HIST 4130 6.0A: Problems in Roman History

Seminar: F 14:30-17:30

The topic for HIST 4130 in 2015-16 will be Caesar’s Household: A Social History of the Roman Imperial Court. Roman emperors have traditionally been studied from the point of view of the political decisions that they made. Until recently, less emphasis has been given to the household or court of which they formed the centre. In this course, we examine the new contributions that ‘court studies’ are making to our understanding of the emperor and his court. Topics to be covered include: the role of concubines, freedmen, slaves, and eunuchs at court; aristocrats at court; political and artistic patronage; the physical contexts of court life; and the emperor on the move. Sources to be used include: Suetonius; Tacitus; Cassius Dio; and the Historia Augusta.

Prerequisites: AP/HIST 2100 6.00 or AP/HUMA 3104 6.00 or AP/HUMA 3106 6.00 or AP/HUMA 3110 6.00 AND AP/HIST 3120 6.00 or AP/HIST 3125 3.00 or AP/HIST 3130 6.00 or AP/HIST 3131 6.00 or AP/HIST 3135 3.00 or AP/HIST 3140 3.00 or AP/HIST 3150 6.00 or AP/HIST 3152 6.00 or AP/HIST 3154 3.00 or AP/HIST 3160 6.00 or departmental permission

This course is restricted to History, Classical Studies or Hellenic Studies Honours majors and minors who have successfully completed at least 84 credits.

Course credit exclusion: PRIOR TO FALL 2009: AS/HIST 4130 6.00.

Grade Breakdown:

  • Book Review - 10%
  • Research Essay - 45%
  • Short Story - 15%
  • Presentations - 15%
  • Seminar Attendance and Participation - 15%

Maximum Enrolment: 18

Course Director: B. Kelly, 2190 Vari Hall, 416-736-2100, ext. 30415

AP/HIST 4250 6.0A: Mediterranean Societies, 1500-1620

Seminar: W 14:30-17:30

Since ancient times, the Mediterranean Sea and its surrounding lands have hosted a succession of rich civilizations. As believers in Christianity, Islam and Judaism uneasily shared the terrain, the region's history was marked by interaction and convivencia, as well as by predation, conquest, and the expulsion of some peoples and states by others During the early modern period (1450-1750) in particular, Europe and the Ottoman Empire wrestled for dominance but neither definitively won. In parallel, scanning large scales of time and space, historians of the Mediterranean have debated the forces of environmental commonalities and networks of economic exchange around the basin. Some scholars have further pushed the notion of shared traits into the realms of social dynamics and cultural values, including urban life, especially in port cities, and honour ethics. The course samples these multilayered histories with a particular interest in encounters, both collaborative and conflictual, between people of different cultures and religions.

This course is a research seminar. More than mastery of established knowledge, it emphasizes inquiry and refinement of skills: framing questions and seeking answers through gathering a variety of primary sources; reading them carefully and astutely; critically assessing secondary scholarship; and developing historical arguments, in part through discussion with other students.

This course is restricted to History or European Studies Honours majors and minors who have successfully completed at least 84 credits.

Prerequisites: AP/HIST 2220 6.00 or AP/HIST 2790 6.00 or AP/HIST 3200 3.00/6.00 or AP/HIST 3212 3.00 or AP/HIST 3220 6.00 or AP/HIST 3221 6.00 or AP/HIST 3234 3.00 or AP/HIST 3240 6.00 or AP/HIST 3280 3.00 or departmental permission.

Course Credit Exclusions: PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusions: AS/HIST 4250 6.00.

Grade Breakdown:

Fall Term:

  • Reading Responses - 15%
  • Primary Source Essay - 10%
  • Group Research Project - 7.5%
  • In-class essay, responding to group projects - 7.5%

Winter Term - individual research project:

  • Preparatory stages: primary source assessment; bibliography; outline - 15%
  • Oral presentation of work in progress - 10%
  • Final, polished essay - 25%
  • Oral participation in class - 10%

Maximum Enrolment: 18

Course Director: E. Cohen, 2128 Vari Hall, 416-736-2100, ext. 66960

AP/HIST 4260 6.0A: Topics in Early Modern European History

Lecture: M 11:30-14:30

"Technologies of Communication: A History of Reading from the Codex to the Kindle"
This course explores the history of books and their readers from Antiquity to the present, with a strong emphasis on the early modern book as a material object. (Throughout the year we will make several excursions to archives and rare books collections.) In taking a hands-on approach to reading and the technologies that have made it possible, we will investigate questions of intellectual property, literacy, print production, the author and his or her audience, and "the future of the book." The syllabus will include theoretical works as well as fictional representations of reading. Students will take turns leading in-class discussions, and in the second term they will write methodologically informed research papers drawing upon primary sources in local collections.

Note: Priority is given to History or European Studies Honours majors and minors who have successfully completed at least 84 credits.

Course credit exclusions: PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusion: AS/HIST 4260 6.00.

Grade Breakdown:

  • Participation, Weekly Forum Posts, & Field Trip Attendance - 20%
  • Discussion Leader - 2 x 5% = 10%
  • Assignment I: Assessing a Digital Archive (3-5 pages) - 10%
  • Assignment II: Reading a Book as Artifact (3-5 pages) - 10%
  • Capstone Essay, including preparatory exercises, mandatory draft, & revision - 50%

Maximum Enrolment: 18

Course Director: M. Schotte, 2138 Vari Hall, 416-736-2100, ext. 30418

AP/HIST 4508 6.0A: Cultures and Colonialism: Canada, 1600-1900

Seminar: W 11:30-14:30

This course explores issues of contact and colonialism in Canadian history from 1600 - 1900. Themes may include the shifting practices of European imperialism; new cultural forms created by First Nations-European contact; changing economic systems; and patterns of state formation.

Priority is given to History or Canadian Studies Honours majors and minors who have successfully completed at least 84 credits.

Course credit exclusion: AS/HIST 4508 6.00.

Grade Breakdown: TBA

Maximum Enrolment: 18

Course Director: V. Freeman, 2161 Vari Hall, 416-736-2100, ext. 66974

AP/HIST 4511 6.0A: Themes in Canadian Social and Cultural History

Seminar: M 19:00-22:00

This course deals with Canadian social and cultural history from early native-colonial contact in the seventeenth century to the late twentieth century. Attention will be paid to relevant socio-cultural aspects of indigenous peoples, French Canada, British North America, and modern multi-ethnic society. Particular themes are dealt with as they become salient for each major period of Canadian history. Themes examined include social change, the formation of new social and economic groups, and the development of social institutions and patterns of thought. Throughout the course the experiences of ordinary people, such as workers and immigrants, are examined within the context of Canada’s development from an European colony to a post-industrial nation.

Course credit exclusions: PRIOR TO FALL 2009: AK/HIST 4200 6.00, AS/HIST 4511 6.00 (prior to Fall/Winter 1994-1995).

Grade Breakdown:

  • Minor Essay: 7-8 pages in autumn term - 15%
  • Major Essay: 18-20 pages in winter term - 40%
  • Oral Presentations: one each term - 15%
  • Class Participation- 20%
  • Written Quiz - 10%

Readings:

  1. Jonathan Vance, A History of Canadian Culture. Toronto: Oxford, 2009
  2. Marcel Martel, Canada the Good: A Short History since 1500. Waterloo, Wilfrid Laurier
    Press, 2014
  3. Ramsey Cook, The Regenerators: Social Criticism in Late Victorian English Canada.
    Toronto: University of Toronto, 1991
  4. George Grant, Lament for a Nation: The Defeat of Canadian Nationalism.
    Montreal: McGill-Queen’s Press, 2005
  5. Bryan Palmer, Canada’s 1960s: The Ironies of Identity in a Rebellious Age.
    Toronto: University of Toronto, 2009
  6. Charles Taylor, The Malaise of Modernity. Toronto: Anansi Press, 2003

Maximum Enrolment: 18

Course Director: Franc Sturino, 618 Atkinson College, 416-736-2100, ext. 33251

AP/HIST 4515 6.0A: Murder in the Archives: Researching the Social History of Homocides in Ontario, 1815-1982

Seminar: T 11:30-14:30

This is a research course, which examines the social history of homicide in Ontario from 1815 to 1982. Each student is required to write a major research paper on a homicide occurring within the Province of Ontario. This paper is based principally on printed and archival sources. In order to assist this research, students are instructed on using online sources as well as archival repositories in the GTA and surrounding area. In the first term, students meet with the instructor and are given weekly assignments, which will form the basis for in class discussions. These assignments provide students guidance on using various types of quantitative and qualitative sources. Quantitative sources, such as the federal census of 1871, provincial vital statistics, and parish registers are used. Qualitative sources, such as newspapers, benchbooks, and coroner's inquests are also surveyed. In the second term, the class moves to the Archives of Ontario where students research their essay and where the instructor assists in deciphering and interpreting documents. Though students are not required to use other repositories in the GTA, such as the United Church Archives and the City of Toronto Archives, they are encouraged to do so.

For the second term essay, students are split into groups of two. Together the students will jointly research a homicide. One student will assume the role of prosecutor and the other student defence attorney. Their individual papers will argue either why someone should be convicted or why someone should be acquitted or their sentence reduced. These arguments will be presented orally late in the term. Final research papers will be due the third week of April.

Priority is given to History Honours Majors and Minors who have successfully completed at least 84 credits.

Course credit exclusion: None

Grade Breakdown:

  • First term archives assignment - 10%
  • First term oral presentation - 10%
  • First term class participation - 20%
  • Second term essay and oral presentation - 60%

Maximum Enrolment: 18

Course Director: W. Wicken, 2192 Vari Hall, 416-736-2100, ext. 66963

AP/HIST 4530 6.0A: The Development of Toronto

Seminar: R 14:30-17:30
Course Website
View course video

This course explores the history of Toronto from the earliest times to the present. As the current largest city in Canada, Toronto offers insights into the complicated history of urbanization in North America. Students in this course will explore the history of the city from its Aboriginal origins to its resettlement by European peoples to its subsequent industrial development. This research seminar will offer students the opportunity to conduct original primary source research on the history of Toronto and make use of local archives, including the City of Toronto Archives and the Archives of Ontario. This course also involves several field trips throughout the city.

Priority is given to History, Canadian Studies or Urban Studies Honours majors and minors who have successfully completed at least 84 credits.

Course credit exclusions: PRIOR TO FALL 2009: AS/HIST 4530 6.00.

Grade Breakdown:

  • Short Research Project Proposal - 5%
  • Short Research Project - 20%
  • Long Research Project Proposal - 5%
  • Long Research Project - 30%
  • Presentation - 10%
  • Discussion participation - 25%
  • Research cluster participation - 5%

Maximum Enrolment: 18

Course Director: S. Kheraj, 2124 Vari Hall, 416-736-2100, ext. 30421

AP/HIST 4535 6.0A: The Body in Canadian History

Seminar: W 19:00-22:00

This course examines the ways that bodies have been shaped and interpreted in Canadian history during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Drawing on international literature as well as Canadian historiography we consider a broad range of topics including language usage, tastes and style, consumption, sporting bodies, health and hygiene, race, religion, gender and ethnicity and the ways that embodiment intersects with all of these analytical categories. The course will focus on the body as a site of contestation in Canadian history and the ways in which an analysis of the body can allow historians to gain insight into concepts of gender, race, class, ethnicity, sexuality, and age.

Note: Priority is given to History Honours Majors and Minors who have successfully completed at least 84 credits.

Course credit exclusion:  None.

Grade Breakdown:  This course consists of three written assignments. The first two assignments will ask students to critically analyze and engage with secondary sources. They will be asked to complete a book review and a short historiographical essay. These assignments will be short ranging from 5-10 pages and will allow students the opportunity to receive feedback on their writing prior to their final primary source research paper. The final paper asks students to write a twenty to thirty page research paper that will demonstrate a clear understanding of the course material and themes.

In order to encourage strong weekly discussion in class, twenty percent of the final grade will be based on participation. Students will also be asked to present on a topic for a given week and guide classroom discussion.

Grade Breakdown

  • Paper one - 15%
  • Paper two - 20%
  • Research paper - 35%
  • Participation - 20%
  • Presentation -10%

Maximum Enrolment: 18

Course Director: TBA

AP/HIST 4570 6.0A: Canada in War and Peace, 1911-1951

Seminar: F 11:30-14:30

The way Canadian political parties and institutions responded to the problems posed by the Great War, the inter-war causes and course of the Depression in the various regions of Canada; its economic and social impact; and the political response - parties and policies - at the national and provincial levels.

Priority is given to History Honours majors and minors who have successfully completed at least 84 credits.

Course Credit Exclusions: PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusion: AS/HIST 4570 6.00.

Grade Breakdown: TBA

Maximum Enrolment: 18

Course Director: TBA

AP/HIST 4755 6.0A: Cultural and Social History of Colonial Latin America

Seminar: T 11:30-14:30

This year the course will examine cultural interactions between indigenous peoples and Spanish missionaries, officials, and settlers in colonial Latin America, with a focus on Mesoamerica (Mexico and Guatemala) and the Andes (Peru, Bolivia, and Ecuador) in the 16th and 17th centuries. We will seek to understand how colonial societies were able to function in spite of deep cultural and linguistic divisions. Special attention will be given to how indigenous thinkers and administrators acted as mediators and managed the intellectual, religious, and administrative demands of their colonial rulers.

Course credit exclusion: Prior TO FALL 2009: AS/HIST 4755 6.00.

Grade Breakdown: TBA

Maximum Enrolment: 18

Course Director: A. Durston, 2126 Vari Hall, 416-736-2100, ext. 66962

AP/HIST 4761 6.0A: Education and Society in Modern China

Lecture: T 14:30 – 17:30

The centralized bureaucratic state of traditional China was governed by a scholar-official elite that was non-hereditary and selected by competitive examinations in the Confucian Classics. For two millennia, Confucian education, and examinations, formed the basis of much of the socio-political system, and of the elite and popular culture. By the beginning of the 20th century, however, Confucianism was challenged by a variety of imported Western ideas. The replacement of the civil service examinations with a modern
school system set the stage for the end of the monarchy and for the passing of the traditional social order.

The late Qing (1901-12), Republican (1912-1949) and Communist (since 1949) governments all made tremendous efforts to control the contents and structure of education, in order to shape the ideological and social landscape of the country, and to facilitate economic development. Teachers and students were mobilized in the mass campaigns launched by the rulers, e.g., the Cultural Revolution (1966-1976). Sometimes they organized their own protest movements to clamour for change towards 'science' and 'democracy', e.g., the May 4th Movement (1919), the Tiananmen Protests (1989) in Beijing, as well as the
2014 "Sunflower Protests" (Taipei) and "Umbrella Movement" (Hong Kong). For much of the 20th century, issues or persons in education were at the centre of political struggles.

This seminar will focus on continuity and change in education and Chinese society from the late 18th century to the turn of the millennium. The course will culminate in each student's Research Essay at the end of the year. During the weekly meetings, the class will discuss the common assigned readings as well as the Presentations (based on each student's individualized readings). The detailed course outline will include a schedule of the common readings as well as recommended individual readings.

Grade Breakdown

Evaluation will be based on a Research Essay, 2 Book Reports (one the individually chosen reading, one each semester), and Participation in class discussions. The essay topic and individual readings will be identified in individual conferences with the course director early each semester.

Class Participation marks (15% x 2 = 30%) will include weekly discussions on the common readings, and 2 Presentations on the individual readings (at least 1 book per term).

The Book Reports marks (10% x 2 = 20%) will be based on the written report on the individual readings. Each book report will be due one week after the in-class presentation on the reading, and should take into account the discussions following the presentation.

The Research Essay (40%) is intended to develop the higher level abilities of research, criticism, analysis and synthesis.

Maximum Enrolment: 18

Course Director: B. Luk, 231 Founders College, 416-736-2100, ext. 66912

AP/HIST 4765 6.0A: Rethinking Gender in East Asian History

Seminar: W 14:30- 17:30

This course examines gender roles in pre-modern and modern China, Korea and Japan. It focuses on women: their places in the family and society, their relationships with one another and men, and the evolution of ideas about gender.

Priority is given to History or East Asian Studies Honours majors and minors who have successfully completed at least 84 credits.

Prerequisites: AP/HIST 2710 6.00 or AP/HIST 3760 6.00 or AP/HIST 3766 3.00 or AP/HIST 3770 6.00 or AP/HIST 3775 3.00 or AP/HUMA 2420 9.00 or AP/HUMA 2430 9.00 or AP/HUMA 2435 9.00 or AP/HUMA 3500 6.00 or AP/HUMA 3505 3.00 or AP/HUMA 3506 3.00 or AP/HUMA 3510 6.00or departmental permission.

Course Credit Exclusion: PRIOR TO FALL 2009: AS/HIST 4765 6.00.

Grade Breakdown: TBA

Maximum Enrolment: 18

Course Director: J. Kim, 706 Kaneff Tower, 416-736-2100, ext. 30402

AP/HIST 4800 6.0A: The Science of Society: Social Thought in North America, 1890-1940

Seminar: T 12:30-14:30

The period 1890 to 1940 saw a major shift in social and cultural thought in North America because of war, economic development, industrial and technological change, urbanization, immigration, scientific and medical developments. A wide array of individuals and institutions in psychology, criminology, anthropology, social work, sociology, economics, political science, home economics, literature, history, religion, law, consumerism, advertising and popular culture wrestled with the impact of these changes and tried to devise new ideas about society and human motivation. This course focuses on these developments as a way to understand Canadian and American culture and society in the late nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Readings and discussions examine the currents of thought in each of these areas, and in related movements for social reform. Accordingly, students will deal with a wide variety of texts, including novels, and analyses of culture and popular culture. A highlight of the course is the second term class mini-conference consisting of poster presentations from all of the seminar participants.

Priority is given to History, Humanities and Social & Political Thought Honours majors and minors who have successfully completed at least 84 credits.

Course credit exclusions: PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusion: AS/HIST 4800 6.00, AS/HUMA 4220 6.00.

Grade Breakdown:

  • 1 analytical review essay based on secondary sources (first term) - 20%
  • 1 major research essay based on primary sources (second term) - 40%
    (10% for preliminary poster presentation; 30% for final paper)
  • Seminar leadership (1 per term) - 10% x 2 = 20%
  • Weekly seminar attendance, participation, and contribution (both terms) - 20%

Maximum Enrolment: 18

Course Director: M. Shore, 2184 Vari Hall, 416-736-2100, ext. 66975

AP/HIST 4830 6.0A: In Slavery and Freedom: Blacks in the Americas

Seminar: W 11:30-14:30

This course examines and compares the responses of Africans and their descendants to the experiences of enslavement, racism, colonialism and imperialism from the 15th century to the 20th century and analyses the impact of the African presence on western 'civilization'.

Priority is given to History Honours majors and minors who have successfully completed at least 84 credits.

Course credit exclusion: AS/HIST 4830 6.00.

Grade Breakdown: TBA

Maximum Enrolment: 18

Course Director: TBA

AP/HIST 4840 6.0A: Public History Workshop

Seminar: M 16:00-19:00

This course examines the forms, goals, and practices of making history in museums, archives, historic sites, and other institutions of public history. It enables students to learn the meaning and methods in the production of memory and introduces them to the practical skills for the public presentation of historical knowledge. The course combines analytical study with a part-time placement in a public-history site.

Priority is given to History Honours Majors and Minors who have successfully completed at least 84 credits.

Course credit exclusion: None

Grade Breakdown: TBA

Maximum Enrolment: 18

Course Director: TBA

AP/HIST 4000 6.0A - Honours Essay

The course is normally open only to majors of exceptional ability (defined as a B+ or higher average in History). It counts as a seminar.

Students must apply for permission to do an Honours Essay by submitting at the beginning of Fall Term a formal letter to the Department Chair accompanied by written recommendations from two Department faculty members. The letter should outline the relevant course work that has prepared the student for an Honours Essay, the primary and secondary research that will be undertaken (including a bibliography), and the schedule of work. The letter should also indicate which Department faculty member will supervise the student’s work and which Department faculty member is suggested as second reader. The faculty recommenders may serve as supervisor and second reader. Students are responsible for finding Department faculty members willing to serve as supervisor and suggested second reader. The second reader is officially appointed at the discretion of the Chair.

The following timetable is recommended:

  • 15 November: Detailed Outline
  • 1 December: Progress Report
  • 15 February: First Draftb
  • 30 March: Submission Deadline

The Honours Essay must be submitted to the supervisor and second reader by 30 March. A bound copy on 8 1/2" x 11" white bond paper must also be submitted to the Chair of the Department by 30 March. The copy will be retained by the Department. Normally, the essay will be between 70 and 125 double-spaced pages, although shorter essays may be acceptable depending on the type of research undertaken.
The Honours Essay will be read by both the supervisor and the second reader. The grading of the essay will be based on the following categories:

A+     excellent
A        superior
B+     very good
B        good
C+     acceptable honors
C        acceptable non-honors
D        poor
F        failure

Should the grades assigned by the supervisor and the second reader not differ by more than one category (e.g., B and B+), the higher grade will stand. When there is a discrepancy of two or more grades assigned by the supervisor and the second reader (e.g., A and B), a third reader will be appointed by the Chair. In such instances the grade for the essay will be the average of the two highest grades.

Along with the grade assigned for the essay, the supervisor and second reader will submit a brief written report that comments on the content, style, organization, and originality of the essay. The Chair reserves the right to require an oral examination on the essay. In such instances, the examining board will comprise of the supervisor, the second reader, and a third person appointed by the Chair. The final course grade will be decided by these three persons. Examiners will submit their reports to the Chair within two weeks.

Students may take AP/HIST 4000 6.0 with instructors in whose fourth-year seminar they are enrolled. In such cases, it is understood that the seminar and the Honours Essay course are separate, each with its own requirements.

AP/HIST 4990 3.0A (F), AP/HIST 4990 3.0M (W), AP/HIST 4990 6.0A: Supervised Reading and Research

This course is normally open only to majors of exceptional ability (defined as a B+ or higher average in History) with the permission of the Chair or Director of Undergraduate Studies. Students may take no more than six credits under this course rubric.

To apply for permission to do History 4990, students must submit a formal application to the Director of Undergraduate Studies, normally at the beginning of Term. Application forms (available in Vari Hall 2140) require: a brief course description and rationale; a proposed evaluation breakdown (at least 60% of the final grade must be based on written work); a list of relevant History courses completed and in-progress; a representative bibliography (with a minimum of 20 titles listed in standard academic format); and the name and signature of the supervisor (who must normally be full-time faculty in the Department of History). Students are responsible for finding Department members willing to serve as supervisor.

The Chair or Director of Undergraduate Studies must be satisfied that the subject of History 4990 is demonstrably distinct and separate from that of any other course taken by the student. History 4990 may be supervised by the instructor in another of the student’s courses.

The detailed programme of study will be determined by the student and the supervisor. Students are expected to prepare a substantial amount of written work. The student’s final grade will be based primarily (at least 60%) on the assessment of the written work by the course.

Normally, in any one year, no instructor may supervise more than a total of three courses under the rubrics of AP/HIST 4000 6.0 (Honours Essay), AP/HIST 4990 6.0 (Supervised Reading and Research), or AP/HIST 3990 6.0 (Supervised Reading and Research).

  • Students may take directed reading courses only after having successfully completed (passed)
  • 24 credits in the Faculty of Liberal Arts & Professional Studies.
  • The maximum permissible number of directed reading courses depends on a student’s program type. Students in Honours BA programs may take 24 such credits; students in a BA program may take 18 such credits.
  • Within their last 30 credits, students may take a maximum of 12 credits in directed reading courses.
  • Students may take a maximum of 12 credits of directed reading courses with the same faculty member.

AP/HIST 4991 3.0A (F), AP/HIST 4991 3.0M (W), AP/HIST 4991 6.0A - Advanced Seminar in History

Fourth-year students who have an average in their major of B+ or better may be allowed to register in some 5000-level courses in the Graduate Programme in History. As with 4000-level courses, admission is at the course director’s discretion. Undergraduates in such courses will have the same workload as their graduate classmates.

The History Department will record the enrolment as AP/HIST4991 6.0/3.0, Advanced Seminar in History, on the student’s transcript, and it will count as a 4000-level seminar. On request, the department will attest, on letterhead, that History 4991 is a graduate-level course. For further information and permission to enrol, see the Director of Undergraduate Studies.