3000 Level

AP/HIST 3125 3.0A (FALL): Sport and Society in Ancient Greece

Lecture: MW 16:00-17:30

This course studies the place of athletic competition in ancient Greek society, with a particular focus on the Archaic and Classical periods (eighth - fourth centuries BC) and on the panhellenic games, of which the Olympic Games were the most important.

Course credit exclusion:  Prior TO FALL 2009: AS/HIST 3125 3.00.

Grade Breakdown: TBA

Maximum Enrolment: 35

Course Director: TBA

AP/HIST 3135 3.0M (WINTER): Spectacle and Society in Ancient Rome

Lecture: MW 16:00-17:30

This course traces the development of gladiatorial presentations, chariot-races and other public spectacles in Rome, Italy and the Roman Empire from 200 BC to 400 AD. It concentrates in particular on their changing nature, scale and socio-cultural function.

Course credit exclusion:  Prior TO FALL 2009: AS/HIST 3135 3.00.

Grade Breakdown: TBA

Maximum Enrolment: 35

Course Director: TBA

AP/HIST 3150 6.0A: Early Greek History from the Bronze Age to the Persian Wars

Lecture: MW 13:00-14:30

This course examines the political, social, economic and intellectual history of Greece in the Bronze Age and the Archaic Period. It covers Mycenean Greece, the Dark Age, the rise of the city-state and culminates in the Persian Wars.

Course credit exclusion:  Prior TO FALL 2009: AS/HIST 3150 6.00.

Grade Breakdown: TBA

Maximum Enrolment: 35

Course Director: TBA

AP/HIST 3154 3.0A (FALL): Egypt from Alexander to Cleopatra

Lecture: R 14:30-17:30

Examines the social and cultural history of Ptolemaic Egypt from the Macedonian occupation in 332 BC to the death of Cleopatra VII in 30 BC.

Course credit exclusion: None.

Grade Breakdown: TBA

Maximum Enrolment: 35

AP/HIST 3160 6.0A: Women and Gender in Ancient Greece & Rome

Lecture: MW 17:30-19:00

This course challenges the traditional dichotomy between women's history and great man history by addressing questions of gender roles and their social functions in Greek and Roman society. Surviving evidence from the ancient world is primarily literature written by men of the upper strata of society. A major focus of this course will be to determine what these texts can tell us: are they idealizing, normative, realistic, or a mixture? What can we learn about societal roles and expectations of men, women, and those who cross the line in antiquity? Topics run the gamut from the recent re-interpretation of Neolithic "Venus" figurines to the Passion of Perpetua. Material is taken up chronologically and includes written evidence (both documentary and literary), archaeological finds (such as votive offerings, tomb reliefs, and vase paintings), and modern gender theory. In this way, we can examine the way that women and men represented themselves and each other in both public and private modes.

Course Credit Exclusions: Prior TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusions: AS/HIST 3160 6.00, AS/HIST 3930D 6.00 (prior to Fall/Winter 2003-2004).

Grade Breakdown:

  • Mid-year exam - 20%
  • Primary Source Analysis #1 - 10%
  • Primary Source Analysis #2 - 10%
  • Research Essay - 25%
  • Annotated Bibliography - 5%
  • Final Exam - 20%
  • Participation - 10%

Maximum Enrolment: 35

Course Director: J. Neel, 2130 Vari Hall, 416-736-2100, ext. 30422

AP/HIST 3180 6.0A: The Rise and Fall of the Sassanian Empire, 224-642

Lecture: TR 10:00-11:30

The course will cover the origins of the Sassanians of Iran, their rise and domination of the Middle East, and their subsequent defeat and fall at the hands of the Arab Muslims.

Equal attention will be paid to the political, economic, religious, and cultural developments. Special focus will be placed on the elements which had a direct impact the subsequent Islamic civilization. Among the themes and topics covered: the problematic of the so-called “steppe-sown” interaction; the impact of Mesopotamian, Iranian and Hellenistic culture; the nature and development of Zoroastrianism; the fall of the Parthians and the establishment of the Sassanian state; administrative and legal reforms; economic production and trade; aspects of everyday life including the position and role of subaltern classes; art, architecture and literature; the imperial capital at Ctesiphon; the spread of Christianity and Gnosticism; the struggle with Rome and Byzantium; the relationship with India and Central Asia; the threat from Arabia; the fall in Iraq; the continuing legacy of the Sassanians in Islamic civilization.

Course Credit Exclusion: Prior TO FALL 2009: AS/HIST 3180 6.00.

Grade Breakdown: TBA

Maximum Enrolment: 35

Course Director: T. Abdullah, 2158 Vari Hall, 416-736-2100, ext. 30412

AP/HIST 3222 3.0 (FALL): From the Norman Conquest to the Magna Carta and Beyond: England in the High Middle Ages

Lecture: M 11:30-14:30

This course surveys English history from the mid-eleventh century to the end of the thirteenth century, beginning with the Norman Conquest and ending with the reign of Edward I. The course examines the history and nature of England's ruling dynasties in this era and provides an introduction to key developments in the social, cultural and religious history of high medieval England.

Course Credit Exclusion: None

Grade Breakdown: TBA

Maximum Enrolment: 35

Course Director: R. Schneider, 2161 Vari Hall, 416-736-2100, ext. 66974

AP/HIST 3223 3.0M (WINTER): From Edward I to the Wars of the Roses: England in the Late Middle Ages

Lecture: T 19:00-22:00

This surveys English history in the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries, from the reign of Edward I through the War of the Roses. The course examines the story and nature of England’s ruling dynasties in this era and provides an introduction to key developments in the social, cultural and religious history of late medieval England.

Course credit exclusion: None.

Grade Breakdown: TBA

Maximum Enrolment: 35

Course Director: TBA

AP/HIST 3240 6.0A: Renaissance and Reformation: Brand New or New Again

Lecture: T 14:30-17:30

How did inadequate education, greed, power struggles and rapid change produce Renaissance high culture? Was it a return to classical education, culture and institutions? A religious renewal? Or new social, political and economic patterns shaping the modern world?
Throughout this course, we will read and analyze pivotal primary and secondary sources. The syllabus will place considerable emphasis on science and technology, gender, and diversity in local and global arenas. Students will prepare in-class presentations, analyze digital sources and material objects, and write two exams. The course also includes several field trips to special collections libraries.

Course credit exclusions: GL/HIST 3250 3.00, GL/HIST 3255 3.00.
PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusions: AK/HUMA 3460 6.00, AK/HUMA 3660 6.00 (taken between F84 and S91), AK/HIST 3410 6.00 (prior to Summer 1996), AK/HIST 3550 6.00, AK/HIST 3780 6.00 (prior to Summer 2003), GL/HIST 3250 3.00 and GL/HIST 3255 3.00.

Grade Breakdown:

  • Participation, including In-Class Exercises & Field Trip Attendance - 20%
  • Quizzes - 6%
  • Short Paper (3-4 pages) - 10%
  • Podcast Debate (10 minutes) - 15%
  • Fall Exam - 24%
  • Winter Exam - 25%

Maximum Enrolment: 35

Course Director: M. Schotte, 2138 Vari Hall, 416-736-2100, ext. 30418

AP/HIST 3261 3.0M (WINTER): Creating Israel: the Zionist Idea, 1870-1948

Lecture: TR 10:00-11:30

This course studies the emergence of Zionism as a Jewish national movement in the 19th century, arguments for and against Zionism made in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, and the conflicts and debates among Zionist thinkers over their ideas and visions. It also examines debates about events leading to the birth of the State of Israel in 1948.

Course Credit Exclusions: None

Grade Breakdown: TBA

Maximum Enrolment: 35

Course Director: K. Weiser, 754 York Research Tower, 416-736-2100, ext. 33561

AP/HIST 3356 3.0A (FALL): Greeks in the World. A History of Greek Migration and Diaspora in the 20th Century

Lecture: R 16:00-19:00

This course examines the history of migration from Greece to North America, Africa, Australia, West Europe and the former Soviet Union from the late nineteenth to the twentieth century. The course draws on methods and approaches to migration and Diasporas history to introduce students to the main issues in the history Greek migration, communities and diaspora. The course combines historical narrative on the development of Greek diaspora, especially in the United States and Canada, with a focus on specific communities, their relations with non-Greek immigrant communities and the global forces (wars and economic crises) that have shaped migration trends around the world from the late nineteenth century to the present.

Course Credit Exclusions: AP/HIST 3356 6.0, AS/HIST 3356 6.0

Grade Breakdown: None

Maximum enrollment: 35

Course Director: S. Gekas, 2120 Vari Hall, 736-2100, ext. 30423

AP/HIST 3385 3.0A (FALL): Empires and Colonial Rule in the Modern Mediterranean

Lecture: T 11:30-14:30

This course introduces students to the history of the modern Mediterranean region through its colonization by European powers (Britain, France and Italy). The course examines colonial expansion and rule from the nineteenth until the middle of the twentieth century, when nationalist uprisings and movements gave rise to independent post-colonial states in North Africa and the Middle East. Students will engage with debates about the beginnings of modernization in the Mediterranean, the unity of the Mediterranean, North Africa and the Middle East and debates on de-colonization. The course will build on the students' knowledge of modern European history and expand on the history of colonial powers in the Mediterranean but no previous knowledge is required. The course compares different forms of rule and colonial practices introduced by each of the colonial powers. Students have the opportunity to specialize in the history of French, British or Italian colonization in the Mediterranean. There is a focus on major events in world history, from Napoleon’s Egypt Campaign to the colonization of Mediterranean islands and North Africa, to the First and Second World Wars, to de-colonization and the Suez Crisis and the emergence of the Palestinian-Israeli conflict. Students will be able to discuss concepts such as 'orientalism', 'power', 'resistance', 'collaboration' and 'post-colonialism' in the Mediterranean historical context and in the light of recent developments in North Africa and the Middle East. Students will also be able to reflect on European history through the colonial past of some major European powers. This approach to Mediterranean history will prepare students for their fourth-year seminars in Modern European History and other courses in the Humanities and Social Sciences.

Course Credit Exclusions: None.

Grade Breakdown: None

Maximum enrollment: 35

Course Director: S. Gekas, 2120 Vari Hall, 736-2100, ext. 30423

AP/HIST 3386 3.0A (WINTER): Cooperation, Competition, and Conflict: Jews and non-Jews in Eastern Europe, 1914-1945

 

Lecture: W 11:30-14:30

Following World War I, most European Jews found themselves living in states such as Poland, Lithuania, Rumania, Hungary and Czechoslovakia that emerged from the wreckage of the Habsburg and Tsarist Empires. A post-war democratic order that accorded recognition to the principle of national self-determination promised them and their non-Jewish neighbours unprecedented opportunities to fulfill political and cultural ambitions as both individual citizens and as collectives. The period between the two world wars was one of paralleled cultural and political vibrancy in Jewish life. It saw the intensification of competing trends within Jewish society – among them, the clash between religious devotion and secularism, the development of rival nationalist and socialist movements, the striving for integration into the dominant non-Jewish culture alongside the growth of an autonomous modern cultural sphere functioning in Jewish and non-Jewish languages – against a backdrop of economic and political crises, new forms of antisemitism, and explosive tensions between national groups populating the region.

Beginning with a survey of life in the new states of East Central Europe in the 1920s and 30s, this course ends with an exploration the fate of Jews and their neighbours under Nazi and Soviet occupations during World War II. It focuses on developments within Jewish societies as well as relations between Jews and non-Jews in the region throughout this period, which culminated in the deaths of millions and the near complete obliteration of a centuries-old Jewish presence there.

Course Credit Exclusions: None

Grade Breakdown:

  • Student attendance and regular participation (i.e. contributing to class discussions) - 15%
  • Map Quiz - 10%
  • Midterm Exam - 25%
  • Book Assignment - 20%
  • Final Exam - 30%

Maximum Enrolment: 35

Course Director: K. Weiser, 754 York Research Tower, 416-736-2100, ext. 33561

AP/HIST 3390 6.0A: Europe Since 1870

Lecture: TR 10:00-11:30

An examination of political, economic, cultural and social developments in the leading states; imperialism and economic development; the balance of power and World War I; democracy and totalitarianism between the wars; World War II and its aftermath; European integration and ongoing challenges of nationalism.

Course Credit Exclusions: Prior TO FALL 2009: AK/HIST 3450 6.00 (prior to Fall/Winter 1995-1996), AK/HIST 3590 6.00 (prior to Fall/Winter 2007-2008).

Grade Breakdown: None

Maximum enrollment: 35

Course Director: A. Yates, 2134 Vari Hall, 416-736-2100, ext. 66970

AP/HIST 3400 6.0A: Tudor and Stuart England: 1485 to 1714

Lecture: R 8:30-11:30

Examines the recovery and development of English society after the late medieval crisis. Topics include: aristocracy and peasantry; crime and the law; women; religion; the Tudor state; the Civil War.

Course credit exclusions: GL/HIST 3390 3.00, GL/HIST 3395 3.00.
Prior TO FALL 2009: AK/HIST 3580 6.00, AS/HIST 3400 6.00, GL/HIST 3390 3.00, GL/HIST 3395 3.00.

Grade Breakdown: TBA

Maximum Enrolment: 35

Course Director: TBA

AP/HIST 3531 6.0A: The Working Class in Canadian Society

Cross-Listed to: AP/SOSC 3210 6.0

Enrolment in this course is undertaken by its 'Home' unit, the Department of Social Science. For more information about this course please contact the Department of Social Science.

Lecture: W 14:30-16:30
Tutorials: R 10:30-11:30; R 11:30-12:30; W 12:30-13:30; W 13:30-14:30; W 12:30-13:30; W 13:30-14:30

This course considers the emergence and reconstitution of a working class in Canada over the past 200 years. This process involved the capitalist restructuring that brought a large class of wage‑earners into existence, the struggles by Canadian workers to assert their needs and concerns, and the intervention of the state to meet various working‑class challenges.

Throughout these discussions, we confront a series of persistent questions:

  1. Why was wage‑labour so limited for so long in Canada, and what implications did limited wage‑earning have for the relations between employer and worker?
  2. What goes into the making of a working class, and in what ways can it be remade?
  3. What are the motivations and impact of managerial and technological change in the workplace?
  4. What is the impact of unionization on the workplace and the society more generally?
  5. How has the working‑class family adapted to the transformations of the wage‑earning world?
  6. What is the role of working women in industrial capitalist society?
  7. What is the impact of wage labour on life off the job?
  8. What are the collective aspirations of workers for changes in their status within industrial capitalist society?
  9. Is there an independent working‑class culture?

Course credit exclusions:

Grade Breakdown:

  • Essay 1 - 15%
  • Essay 2 - 30%
  • First-Term Test - 15%
  • Final Examination - 25%
  • Participation - 15%

Course Director: J. Stephen, 129 Founders College, 416-736-2100, ext. 66930

Maximum Enrolment: 100

AP/HIST 3533 6.0A: The History of Women in Canada

Lecture: T 14:30-17:30

The political, economic and social history of women in Canada, from 1600 to the present. A thematic approach investigates commonalities and differences of women's experience.

Course Credit Exclusions:
GL/HIST 3690 6.00, GL/SOSC 3690 6.00, and GL/WMST 3690 6.00.
Prior TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusions: AK/HIST 2220 6.00, AK/HIST 3200 6.00, AS/HIST 3533 6.00, GL/HIST 3690 6.00, GL/SOSC 3690 6.00, and GL/WMST 3690 6.00.

Grade Breakdown:  TBA

Maximum Enrolment: 35

Course Director: C. Loch-Drake, 2127 Vari Hall, 416-736-2100, ext. 40626

AP/HIST 3535 6.0A: African-Canadian History

Lecture: T 11:30-14:30

The course begins with the early decades of European settlement of the seventeenth century when Africans first arrived in New France, primarily as slaves. We explore the experiences of Black Loyalists, slaves in British North America and the ‘passengers’ of the Underground Railroad and assess the structures of African Canadian communities, institutions and abolition movements. Twentieth century themes include Black Canadians’ contributions to the emerging Canadian nation, the impact of Black Power, as well as the concerns of the ‘new newcomers’ from the United States, Africa and the Caribbean. The course brings into sharp focus the historical production of racial categories and racist thought and practice in Canada and examines the experiences of this ‘visible minority’ within the context of ‘multiculturalism’.

Course Credit Exclusions (PRIOR TO FALL 2009): AK/HIST 3300 6.00, AS/HIST 3535 6.00.

Grade Breakdown:

  • Film Critiques (one per term) - 10%
  • Reading Responses (one per term) - 10%
  • First Term Essay - 15%
  • December Examination - 20%
  • Second Term Research Essay - 20%
  • April Examination - 15%
  • Tutorial Participation - 10%

Maximum Enrolment: 35

Course Director: M. Johnson, 321a York Lanes, 416-736-2100, ext. 66933

AP/HIST 3546 6.0A: History of Aboriginal Peoples in Canada

Lecture: R 16:00-19:00

Examines the history of Aboriginal peoples within the area known today as Canada, from "time immemorial" to the postwar period. Topics may include origin stories; oral traditions; interactions with colonial empires; participation in the fur trade; epidemic diseases and health strategies; indigenous spirituality and Christian missionaries; treaties; the Indian Act; residential schooling; reserve life; political resistance; and land claims.

Course credit exclusions: None

Grade Breakdown: TBA

Maximum Enrolment: 35

Course Director: TBA

AP/HIST 3555 6.0A: Canadian Jewish History

Lecture: W 11:30-14:30

This course will outline the dynamic, ever-changing Canadian Jewish experience from the colonial era orbit, through the turn of the digital age - some 250 years.  It explores the great diversity of Canadian Jewry: its variety in ethnicity, class and religious practice, its regional variations in small towns, farms, factory & mining towns, and in roaring cities, coast to coast.  The course emphasizes the ruptures and wonders of mass mirgration, religious and political tensions among Canadian Jews from the 1940s through the 1980s, and the ways in which Jews negotiated relationships with non-Jews in Canada, as well as its politics, its landscape, its race relations, its religious spheres, and eventually, its embrace of multiculturalism. It will touch on Canadian Jewry’s relations with the state of Israel, anti-Semitism, and the political, economic and cultural contributions Jews have made to Canadian life, always placing the Canadian Jewish experience in the broader context of global Jewish life.

It is a lecture & research course; there is content to learn, and there are professional and practical skills to develop.  The lectures will be steadily punctuated with trips to nearby archives, guest speakers, short films, and hands-on work with primary sources including newspapers, memoirs, obituaries, photographs, maps, poetry, and other archival and cultural materials.  Throughout the year, the instructor and archivists (at the Ontario Jewish Archives) will help students develop, revise, and present original research based on students' own unique interests, thereby adding new knowledge and understanding of Canadian Jewish life.

Course credit exclusion: Prior TO FALL 2009: AS/HIST 3555 6.00.

Grade Breakdown:

First Semester:

  • Analyzing the Field - 10%
  • Research Proposal - 10%
  • First-Term Test - 10%

Second Semester:

  • Research Paper - 20%
  • Peer Review - 5%
  • Revisions of Research - 15%
  • Presentation - 10%
  • Participation - 10%
  • Second-Term Test - 10%

Maximum Enrolment: 35

Course Director: D. Koffman, 757 Kaneff Tower, 416-736-2100, ext. 77395

AP/HIST 3580 6.0A: Twentieth-Century Canada

Lecture: W 8:30-11:30

The purpose of this course is to explore the social, economic and political contours of Canada during the twentieth century. We will pay particular attention to national identity and celebrations, regional and provincial distinctiveness, immigration and multiculturalism, Native-Newcomer relations, and gendered experiences. Attention to imperialism, colonialism, continentalism and nation formation will be critical to our understanding of where Canada has situated itself in global terms over the past one hundred years. We will also place special emphasis on the impact of war on twentieth-century Canadian society and the ways that it has served to both divide and unite the country. Another important dimension of this course is to explore age as a category of analysis. How has childhood changed throughout the century, and how can we assess generations within the context of the 20th century? What are the differences between those who came of age in the early 1940s and those who entered the adult world in the early 1960s? How do generations cut across twentieth-century Canadian history, and what were some of the defining characteristics of the Baby Boom generation, suburbanites in the 1950s, and the beneficiaries of the Welfare State? Finally, we will consider the expansion of the national security state, from the containment of indigenous people within reserves/residential schools through to the surveillance of labour, socialist, aboriginal, student and feminist and other activists throughout the 20th century.

Course credit exclusions: Prior TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusion: AS/HIST 3580 6.00.

Grade Breakdown:

  • Mid-term exam - 20%
  • Essay 1 - 20%
  • Essay 2 Outline - pass/fail
  • Essay 2 - 20%
  • Final examination - 25%
  • Participation - 10%
  • Presentation - 5%

Maximum Enrolment: 35

Course Director: J. Stephen, 129 Founders College, 416-736-2100, ext. 66930

AP/HIST 3581 6.0A: Immigrant Experience in Canada

Lecture: T 14:30-17:30

This course deals with the peopling of Canada from the first European colonies in the seventeenth century to the large-scale immigration following the Second World War. The changing nature of immigration will be studied as French and British settlement gave way to European movements, then followed by immigration from developing countries in the late twentieth century. The focus is on the immigrants’ experience as they encountered New World economic, social and political realities. Throughout, the tensions between newcomers and settled Canadians are examined as manifested in government policy, public attitudes, labour strife and cultural conflict. Finally, the question of whether ethnic and racial tensions have been resolved by policies of multiculturalism will be addressed.

Course credit exclusion: Prior TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusions: AK/CDNS 3050 6.00 (prior to Summer 1999), AK/HIST 3240 6.00, AK/HIST 3710 6.00 (prior to Summer 1996), AK/SOCI 3640I 6.00 (prior to Summer 2001).

Grade Breakdown:

  • Minor Essay: 5-6 pages in autumn term - 15%
  • Major Essay: 10-12 pages in winter term - 30%
  • Oral Presentations: one each term - 15%
  • Class Participation (includes 5% attendance) - 20%
  • In-class test (in winter term) - 20%

Readings:

  1. Valerie Knowles, Strangers at our Gates: Canadian Immigration and Immigration Policy, 1540-2006. Toronto: Dundurn, 2007
  2. Donald MacKay, Flight from Famine: The Coming of the Irish to Canada. Toronto: McClelland & Stewart, 2002
  3. Franc Sturino, Forging the Chain: Italian Migration to North America, 1880-1930. Toronto: Multicultural History Society of Ontario, 1990
  4. Joseph Mensah, Black Canadians: history, experiences, social conditions. Halifax: Fernwood, 2002
  5. Walter Johnson, The Challenge of Diversity. Montreal: Black Rose, 2006
  6. Michael Ondaatje, In the Skin of the Lion. Toronto: Vintage, 1996

Maximum Enrolment: 35

Course Director: F. Sturino, 618 Atkinson College, 416-736-2100, ext. 33251

AP/HIST 3622 3.0M (WINTER): The U.S. Civil War in American History and Public Memory

Lecture: TR 14:30-16:00

If any event in U.S. History can be called pivotal, surely it would be the Civil War. It transformed American society and the relationship of every American citizen to their state and federal governments. The war resulted in over 1 million casualties with nearly 1 in 5 white males between the age of 13 and 43 dying in the South. It dramatically reshaped the nation’s economic and political structures. And by war’s end, some 3.5 million enslaved African Americans had been freed. In the one hundred fifty years since, the Civil War has emerged as a significant touchstone for historical memory and cultural identity in the United States. “The Civil War is our felt history—history lived in the national imagination,” wrote Robert Penn Warren in 1961.

In exploring the history and memory of the Civil War, this single term course will use the conflict as a lens through which to view the evolving American zeitgeist. It will introduce students to the history of the U.S. Civil War and explore its continuing legacy in American culture. We will investigate how historians have debated the causes of the Civil War and why, at various times, they have emphasized political, economic, social or cultural motivations. We will consider the experience of the war and explore its effect on notions of death and dying in the United States. And we will investigate history of Reconstruction, its aftermath, and the enduring memory of the Civil War in American culture.

Course credit exclusions: AP/HIST 3622 3.00 (prior to Fall 2014).
Prior TO FALL 2009: AS/HIST 3622 3.00.

Grade Breakdown:

The grading scheme for the course conforms to the 9-point grading system used in undergraduate programs at York (e.g., A+ = 9, A = 8, B+ - 7, C+ = 5, etc.). Assignments and tests will bear either a letter grade designation or a corresponding number grade (e.g. A+ = 90 to 100, A = 80 to 90, B+ = 75 to 79, etc.) The grade for the course will be based on the following percentages:

  • 60% - Quizzes (3 x 20%)
  • 30% - Final Essay
  • 10% - Attendance/Participation

Maximum Enrolment: 35

Course Director: B. Cothran, 2132 Vari Hall, 416-736-2100, ext. 66959

AP/HIST 3692 6.0A: The United States in the World

Lecture: M 16:00-19:00

This course examines the far-reaching impact the US has had on other nations as well as the ways that interactions with other nations have changed American society and culture since Independence, especially in the 20th century.

Course credit exclusions: PRIOR TO FALL 2009: AS/HIST 3692 6.00.

Grade Breakdown: TBA

Maximum Enrolment: 50

Course Director: TBA

AP/HIST 3710 3.0A (FALL): Reconstructing Society in the Post Slavery Caribbean

Lecture: T 14:30-17:30

This course examines the patterns of continuity and change in the institutions of post slavery Caribbean societies. The emphasis is on the processes of social re-engineering and cultural creation in the aftermath of nineteenth century slave emancipation and its implications for the contemporary Caribbean.

Course credit exclusion: Prior TO FALL 2009: AS/HIST 3710 6.00; AS/HIST 2730 6.

Grade Breakdown: TBA

Maximum Enrolment: 35

Course Director: D. Trotman, 326 Founders College, 416-736-2100, ext. 33192

AP/HIST 3766 3.0A (FALL): Korea Since World War II

Lecture: W 11:30- 14:30

This course is a survey of twentieth-century Korean history, with emphasis on the social movements and economic development following Korea’s division in 1945. Although initial lectures and discussions review early twentieth-century history, the course focuses on late twentieth-century developments, including US and USSR occupations (1945-1948) after Japanese colonization and the Korean War (1950- 1953). Students then review the consequences of the war including Kim Il-Sung’s policies in the DPRK and Park Chung-Hee military regime (1961-1979) in the ROK. Finally, students consider the consequences of late-twentieth modernization, the labor and student movements of the 1970s and 1980s and the civil movements of the 1990s. The course concludes with a discussion of prospects for unification. The approach is interdisciplinary, inter-periodic, inter-regional and international. The course is composed of two-hours of lectures and an hour of discussion per week. Course work includes a comprehensive research paper, regular attendance, active participation and a final exam.

Course Credit Exclusion: Prior TO FALL 2009: AS/HIST 3766 3.00.

Grade Breakdown:

  • Research Paper - 40%
  • Final Examination - 40%
  • Tutorial Participation - 20%

Maximum Enrolment: 35

Course Director: J. Kim, 706 Kaneff Tower, 416-736-2100, ext. 30402

AP/HIST 3775 3.0M (WINTER): History of Hong Kong

Lecture: R 14:30-17:30

This course examines the economic, political, social and cultural development of the city state of Hong Kong and its environs, within the context of Chinese and British imperial history, from its 19th-century foundations to the present.

Course credit exclusion: (PRIOR TO FALL 2009): AS/HIST 3775 3.00.

Grade Breakdown: TBA

Maximum Enrolment: 35

Course Director: B. Luk, 231 Founders College, 416-736-2100, ext. 66912

AP/HIST 3791 6.0A: The Islamic Gunpower Empires

Lecture: T 12:30-14:30
Tutorial: T 15:30-16:30; T 16:30-17:30

This course studies, in a comparative fashion, the rise, consolidation and decline of the three major early modern Islamic empires (the Ottoman Turks, the Safavids of Persia and the Mughals of India) between 1500 to 1800.

Course credit exclusions: None. PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusion: AS/HIST 3791 6.00.

Grade Breakdown: TBA

Maximum Enrolment: 50

Course Director: T. Abdullah, 2158 Vari Hall, 416-736-2100, ext. 30412

AP/HIST 3792 6.0A The Middle East since 1800

Lecture: W 11:30-14:30

Beginning in the late Ottoman Empire and running up to the present-day, this course will introduce students to the rich and diverse history of one of the world’s most controversial and talked about regions: the Middle East. With emphasis on the impact of colonialism, nationalism, socialism, Islamism and neoliberalism on the various countries, cultures and peoples of the region, the course aims to facilitate the adoption of an informed, critical approach to the study of the Middle East’s past and present. As a corollary, students will debate and interrogate popular representations of the region and its populations. While there will be much discussion of political developments, we will endeavor to engage with social, cultural and intellectual trends, looking to everyday life and common people in addition to major political events and personas.

Course credit exclusion: AP/POLS 3260 6.00.
PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusions: AK/HIST 3920 6.00, AS/HIST 3792 6.00.

Grade Breakdown: TBA

Maximum Enrolment: 35

Course Director: K. Hooshiyar, 2128 Vari Hall, 416-736-2100, ext. 66960

AP/HIST 3829 3.0M (FALL): Antisemitism from the Enlightenment to the Holocaust and Beyond

Cross-Listed: AP/HUMA 3829 3.0

Lecture: TR 10:00-11:30

This course examines the evolution of anti-Jewish thought and behavior as a response to the crisis of modernity. The origins of modern antisemitism can be traced to pagan hostility toward the Jews, Christian anti-Judaism, and the popular demonization of the Jews by the Middle Ages. The emergence of ideologies supported by pseudo-science to justify the exclusion and removal of the Jews from European society and their eventual extermination is very much a result, however, of intellectual, socioeconomic, and political developments that came about around the time of the Enlightenment. The course focuses on the role of antisemitism in shaping 19th and 20th century European society and Jewish life within it, including responses to antisemitism. Ultimately, it seeks to understand the context in which the Holocaust was both conceivable and possible and to look for patterns of recurrent antisemitism in the contemporary world.

Course Credit Exclusions: PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusion: AS/HUMA 3829 3.00.

Grade Breakdown:

  • Attendance and participation - 15%
  • Weekly quizzes based on readings - 25%
  • Mid-term exam - 25%
  • Final exam - 35%

Maximum Enrolment: 35

Course Director: K. Weiser, 754 York Research Tower, 416-736-2100, ext. 33561

AP/HIST 3838 6.0A: Social History of Modern Sport, 1850 - 2000

Lecture: W 11:30-14:30

Examines the social history of sport in urban, industrial economies from 1850 to the present. It explores how gender, race, class, sexuality and ability have influenced people's experiences with sport, and considers how sport has been used to express values like nationalism and imperialism, while also being used to promote social change and human rights.

Course Credit Exclusions: None.

Grade Breakdown: TBA

Maximum Enrolment: 35

Course Director: TBA

AP/HIST 3850 6.0A: Murder and Other Crimes: Law and Justice in 20th Century North America

Lecture: F 8:30-10:30
Tutorials: F 10:30-11:30; F 10:30-11:30; F 11:30-12:30; F 11:30-12:30

This course examines the Canadian and American criminal justice systems in the 20th century. Though the main focus is on famous murder trials -- such as Sacco and Vanzetti (1923) and David Milgaard (1970) -- other well-known criminal trials are analyzed.

Course credit exclusions: Prior TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusion: AS/HIST 3850 6.00.

Grade Breakdown: TBA

Maximum Enrolment: 100

Course Director: TBA

AP/HIST 3870 6.0A Globalization in History

Lecture: T 14:30-17:30

Why did Portugal and Spain set out on missions of overseas conquest in the 1400s – conquests that led to the “discovery” of the Americas? Why did the slave trade begin, how did it function, who was involved, and why did it end – three centuries later? What was the global impact of the French Revolution? How did the people of a small island in northern Europe come to lead the world’s largest modern empire? What impact did the millions of immigrants from China, India, the Middle East and Africa have on the development of the Americas, Africa, and Europe? This course seeks answers to these and other questions as we seek to more broadly understand global connections and “globalization” in human history. We will outline both the positive ways that human connections have shaped the globe, as well as the negative impact that some of these connections have had on populations and the environment. Our story begins with the traders and merchants of the 15th century, with a focus on the dynamic and successful empires in China, India, and the Islamic world. We then turn to the rise of the Portuguese trading empire in sub-Saharan Africa and beyond, and explore the ensuing impact of the Columbus voyage of 1492 in setting the stage for the west’s global dominance. We discuss the rise of the transatlantic slave trade, the trade in global commodities such as salt and sugar, the rise of new technologies (particularly in communication and transportation) and the cultural, political and social impact of the increase in global interconnections.

The second half of the course focuses primarily on the modern period, and, among other topics, we will explore the impact of imperialism, the global effect of the two World Wars and the Cold War, the spread of religion, the impact of epidemics and environmental problems, and issues concerning labourers, immigrants and refugees.

Selected Texts (second term texts TBC - a final list will be available in August 2015)
Robert B. Marks, The Origins of the Modern World: a Global and Ecological Narrative from the Fifteenth to the Twenty-First Century (Lanham, Boulder, NY, Toronto and Oxford: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, 2007).
Erik Gilbert and Jonathan Reynolds, Trading Tastes: Commodity and Cultural Exchange to 1750 (New Jersey: Pearson Prentice Hall, 2006).

Course credit exclusion: Prior TO FALL 2009: AK/HIST 3960 6.00.

Proposed Grade Breakdown

  • Book Review (fall term) - 15%
  • Primary source analysis (fall term, 8-10 pages) - 20%
  • Essay (winter term, 12-15 pages) - 25%
  • Exam - 25%
  • Participation - 15%

Maximum Enrolment: 35

Course Director: D. Neill, York Lanes 313, 416-736-2100, ext. 20365

AP/HIST 3891 3.0M (WINTER): The Nature of Cities: The History of Urban Environments in North America

Lecture: M 16:00-19:00

Urbanization is the predominant form of human settlement in Canada and the United States. Over the course of the nineteenth- and twentieth-centuries, a majority of North Americans came to live in ever more populous cities. This course will examine the environmental consequences of urban development in North America from the end of the eighteenth-century to the twenty-first century.

Course credit exclusion: AP/GEOG 3040 3.00.

Grade Breakdown: TBA

Maximum Enrolment: 35

Course Director: TBA

AP/HIST 3990 3.0A (F), AP/HIST 3990 3.0M (W), AP/HIST 3990 6.0A : Supervised Reading and Research

This course is normally open only to majors of exceptional ability (defined as a B+ or higher average in History) with the permission of the Chair or Director of Undergraduate Studies.  Students may take no more than six credits under this course rubric.

To apply for permission to do History 3990, students must submit a formal application to the Director of Undergraduate Studies, normally at the beginning of Term.  Application forms (available in Vari Hall 2140) require: a brief course description and rationale; a proposed evaluation breakdown (at least 60% of the final grade must be based on written work); a list of relevant History courses completed and in-progress; a representative bibliography (with a minimum of 20 titles listed in standard academic format); and the name and signature of the supervisor (who must normally be full-time faculty in the Department of History).  Students are responsible for finding Department members willing to serve as supervisor.

The Chair or Director of Undergraduate Studies must be satisfied that the subject of History 3990 is demonstrably distinct and separate from that of any other course taken by the student.  History 3990 may be supervised by the instructor in another of the student’s courses.

The detailed programme of study will be determined by the student and the supervisor.  Students are expected to prepare a substantial amount of written work. The student’s final grade will be based primarily (at least 60%) on the assessment of the written work by the course.

Normally, in any one year, no instructor may supervise more than a total of three courses under the rubrics of AP/HIST 4000 6.0 (Honours Essay), AP/HIST 4990 6.0 (Supervised Reading and Research), or AP/HIST 3990 6.0 (Supervised Reading and Research).

  • Students may take directed reading courses only after having successfully completed (passed)
  • 24 credits in the Faculty of Liberal Arts & Professional Studies.
  • The maximum permissible number of directed reading courses depends on a student’s program type. Students in Honours BA programs may take 24 such credits; students in a BA program may take 18 such credits.
  • Within their last 30 credits, students may take a maximum of 12 credits in directed reading courses.
  • Students may take a maximum of 12 credits of directed reading courses with the same faculty member.