Crowds, Crime and Popular Politics in Britain and its Empire

PLEASE NOTE: CONFERENCE RELOCATED TO NATALIE ZEMON DAVIS CONFERENCE ROOM, ROOM 2098, SIDNEY SMITH HALL, DEPARTMENT OF HISTORY, UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO, 100 ST GEORGE STREET, TORONTO

A CONFERENCE IN HONOUR OF NICHOLAS ROGERS

24 to 25 May 2018

 

 

Conference Program

 

NICHOLAS ROGERS

In December 2017, Professor Nicholas Rogers retired from York University after nearly four decades of teaching.  He is a leading historian of eighteenth-century Britain.  In 1991, in one of his last books, E.P.Thompson hailed Nick’s first, Whigs and Cities: Popular Politics in the Age of Walpole and Pitt (1989): ‘his command of the material is superb, and his findings are supported by years of research and analysis of the urban crowd.’  Nick’s latest, Bristol from below: Law, Authority and Protest in England’s Second City, c. 1680-1832 (2017, with Stephen Poole), and the host of books and articles he has published between those dates all testify to his scrupulous care with sources, his sharp eye for unexploited, but immensely revealing topics, and a prose style of clarity, verve, and constant interest.  His book Mayhem (2012) won the premier prize in British studies in North America, the Jon Ben Snow Prize awarded by the North American Conference on British Studies.   He has published on the structure of politics, the poor law, servants, army impresSment, crime and violence, the riotous mob, political crises, naval commanders, policing, Chartism, trials for defamation, and the curious history of Halloween, among other topics, in both general political history and in close local studies. His many graduate students have advanced research in the topics he pioneered, and for forty years York undergraduates in history have enjoyed the lectures of one of the foremost scholars of eighteenth-century England. Nick’s teaching has been innovative (including a popular course on film and history) and at every level.  A Distinguished Research Professor since 2010, his contributions to the York History department and the wider university community in terms of service, teaching, and research are immense.  He is the most generous of colleagues, and his international reputation has benefitted York University enormously over four decades of outstanding scholarship.