4000 Level Courses

AP/HIST 4000 6.0A - Honours Essay

The course is normally open only to majors of exceptional ability (defined as a B+ or higher average in History). It counts as a seminar.

Students must apply for permission to do an Honours Essay by submitting at the beginning of Fall Term a formal letter to the Department Chair accompanied by written recommendations from two Department faculty members. The letter should outline the relevant course work that has prepared the student for an Honours Essay, the primary and secondary research that will be undertaken (including a bibliography), and the schedule of work. The letter should also indicate which Department faculty member will supervise the student’s work and which Department faculty member is suggested as second reader. The faculty recommenders may serve as supervisor and second reader. Students are responsible for finding Department faculty members willing to serve as supervisor and suggested second reader. The second reader is officially appointed at the discretion of the Chair.

The following timetable is recommended:

  • 15 November: Detailed Outline
  • 1 December: Progress Report
  • 15 February: First Draft
  • 30 March: Submission Deadline

The Honours Essay must be submitted to the supervisor and second reader by 30 March. A bound copy on 8 1/2" x 11" white bond paper must also be submitted to the Chair of the Department by 30 March. The copy will be retained by the Department. Normally, the essay will be between 70 and 125 double-spaced pages, although shorter essays may be acceptable depending on the type of research undertaken.
The Honours Essay will be read by both the supervisor and the second reader. The grading of the essay will be based on the following categories:

A+     excellent
A        superior
B+     very good
B        good
C+     acceptable honors
C        acceptable non-honors
D        poor
F        failure

Should the grades assigned by the supervisor and the second reader not differ by more than one category (e.g., B and B+), the higher grade will stand. When there is a discrepancy of two or more grades assigned by the supervisor and the second reader (e.g., A and B), a third reader will be appointed by the Chair. In such instances the grade for the essay will be the average of the two highest grades.

Along with the grade assigned for the essay, the supervisor and second reader will submit a brief written report that comments on the content, style, organization, and originality of the essay. The Chair reserves the right to require an oral examination on the essay. In such instances, the examining board will comprise of the supervisor, the second reader, and a third person appointed by the Chair. The final course grade will be decided by these three persons. Examiners will submit their reports to the Chair within two weeks.

Students may take AP/HIST 4000 6.0 with instructors in whose fourth-year seminar they are enrolled. In such cases, it is understood that the seminar and the Honours Essay course are separate, each with its own requirements.

AP/HIST 4132.0A: Caesar's Palace: A Social History of the Roman Imperial Court

Course Director:  B. Kelly, 2190 Vari Hall, (416)736-2100 x 30415, benkelly@yorku.ca

Course Calendar Description: Roman emperors have traditionally been studied from the point of view of the political decisions that they made. Until recently, less emphasis has been given to the household or court of which they formed the centre. In this course, we examine the new contributions that 'court studies' are making to our understanding of the emperor and his court. Co-requisites: None.  Course credit exclusions: AP/HIST 4130 6.00, 2013-14, 2014-15, and 2015-16.  Priority is given to History, Classical Studies or Hellenic Studies Honours majors and minors who have successfully completed at least 84 credits.

Expanded Course Description:

Roman emperors have traditionally been studied from the point of view of the political decisions that they made. Until recently, less emphasis has been given to the household or court of which they formed the centre. In this course, we examine the new contributions that the historical field of ‘court studies’ are making to our understanding of the Roman emperor and his court. Topics to be covered include: the roles of concubines, freedmen, slaves, and eunuchs at court; aristocrats at court; political and artistic patronage; the physical contexts of court life; and imperial journeys. Sources to be used include: Suetonius; Tacitus; Cassius Dio; and the Historia Augusta. A major goal of the course is to give students the opportunity to undertake an original research project on the court of a particular Roman emperor. Students are also introduced to the sociological and comparative methodologies used to study royal courts in a range of historical eras from the Ancient Near East to the Early Modern period, and we examine how these methodologies can be applied to the study of the Roman imperial court.

Tentative Grade Breakdown/Overview of Assessment:

Emperor Presentation – 10%
Historiographical Essay  – 10%
Five-Minute Thesis Presentation – 5%
Research Essay – 40%
Final Exam – 15%
Seminar Attendance and Participation – 20%

NOTE: Prior to buying textbooks, students should consult the detailed course outline which will give the final versions of the weekly syllabus and the detailed breakdown of assignments with weighting and due dates.  The course outline will be posted in Moodle and discussed on the first day of class.

More information:  http://history.laps.yorku.ca/

AP/HIST 4160 6.0A: Slavery in Ancient Greece & Rome

Course Director:  J. Trevett, 2180 Vari Hall, (416)736-2100 x30409, jtrevett@yorku.ca

Course Calendar Description:

This course explores the phenomenon of slavery in Greek and Roman antiquity, from the Bronze Age until the later Roman empire.
Course credit exclusions: None.
Prior TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusions: AS/HIST 4150A 6.00 (prior to Fall/Winter 2003-2004), AS/HIST 4160 6.00.

Expanded Course Description:

This course explores the phenomenon of slavery in Greek and Roman antiquity, from the Bronze Age until the later Roman empire. Three main areas are covered: ancient attitudes to and theories of slavery from Aristotle to Augustine, the role of slaves in the ancient economy, and the position of slaves in Greek and Roman society. Throughout the course we examine both the continuities within the Greco-Roman world and the ways in which attitudes and practices varied from place to place and over time. We also seek as far as possible to explore the institution of slavery from the slaves’ perspective. Subjects for particular study include: the slave trade; slavery and ethnicity; slavery and the law; slaves’ work; the treatment of slaves; slave resistance and revolts; the freeing of slaves and the status of freed men and women; ancient justifications and criticisms of slavery; the representation of slaves in literature; slavery and Christianity. Consideration is also given to comparative evidence from other historical periods, and to theoretical writings on slavery.

Students enrolled in the course will write two shorter papers in Fall Term, and a longer research paper in Winter Term. The final weeks of the course will be devoted to oral presentation of student research projects.

Core Readings:

T. Wiedemann, Greek and Roman Slavery: A Sourcebook (Routledge, 1981)
K. Bradley, Slavery and Society at Rome (Cambridge, 1994)
P. Garnsey, Ideas of Slavery from Aristotle to Augustine (Cambridge, 1996)

Tentative Grade Breakdown/Overview of Assessment:

Participation (including presentations and leading discussion): 20%
Two shorter papers: 15% and 25% (Fall Term)
Research paper: 40% (Winter Term)

NOTE: Prior to buying textbooks, students should consult the detailed course outline which will give the final versions of the weekly syllabus and the detailed breakdown of assignments with weighting and due dates.  The course outline will be posted in Moodle and discussed on the first day of class.

More information:  http://history.laps.yorku.ca/

AP/HIST 4230 6.0A: Technologies of Communication: A History of Reading from the Codex to the Kindle

Course Director:  M. Schotte, VH 2138, (416)736-2100 x30418, mschotte@yorku.ca

“The Book Wheel” A. Ramelli, Le diverse et artificiose machine del Capitano Agostino Ramelli (1588) Image credit: http://smithsonianlibraries.tumblr.com/

“The Book Wheel”
A. Ramelli, Le diverse et artificiose machine
del Capitano Agostino Ramelli (1588)
Image credit: http://smithsonianlibraries.tumblr.com/

 

Course Calendar Description: This research seminar explores the history of books and their readers from antiquity to the present. Class is held in York's Clara Thomas Archives & Special Collections, and includes trips to other area libraries. By studying books as material objects and communication technologies, we will investigate questions of intellectual property, literacy, author and audience, and "the future of the book." Prerequisites: None. Co-requisites: None. Course credit exclusions: AP/WRIT4720 6.0; prior to 2009, AP/HIST 4260 6.00 (FW14 & FW15 only). Priority is given to History Honours majors and minors who have successfully completed at least 84 credits.

We are all readers, but we rarely stop to analyze the objects that we read. Books and digital readers are far more than simply vehicles for transmitting text. These technologies of communication shape our everyday experience, but also offer lenses into the past and the future. This course surveys key scholarship from the ‘history of the book,’ a field that has something to offer historians of any period.

The class meets in the Clara Thomas Archives, allowing extensive hands-on access to many rare books and original documents. We will examine everything from medieval manuscripts and World War memorabilia, to original CBC radio transcripts, Canadian literary papers, and graphic novels. (Please note: food and drink are prohibited in the Archives; if you cannot make it from 11:30 a.m.-2:15 p.m. without eating, this may not be the class for you!) Over the course of the year, we will go on a number of field trips during class time, including the Archives of Ontario, U of T’s Fisher Library, and the Toronto Reference Library.

This course prioritizes writing, with brief weekly reading responses, two short papers, and a number of assignments that work towards producing and revising a major research paper. The 15-page Capstone essay (including proposal, annotated bibliography, and a mandatory draft) can be on any topic of interest from any time period. Students must make use of a minimum of one substantial historical primary source and must relate their research to the history of the book, reading, media, and/or technologies of communication.

Tentative Grade Breakdown/Overview of Assessment:
Participation and Weekly Forum Posts: 20%
Discussion Leader: 10%
Assignment I: Assessing a Digital Archive (3-5 pages): 10%
Assignment II: Reading a Book as Artifact (3-5 pages): 10%
Capstone Essay, including preparatory exercises: 50%

NOTE: Prior to buying textbooks, students should consult the detailed course outline which will give the final versions of the weekly syllabus and the detailed breakdown of assignments with weighting and due dates.  The course outline will be posted in Moodle and discussed on the first day of class.

More information:  http://history.laps.yorku.ca/

AP/HIST 4350 6.0A: European Thought in Crisis: The Shape of European Thought in the Early 20th Century

Course Director:  A. Haberman , Founders College, 316, (416)736-2100 x66942, arthurhaberman1@gmail.com

Course Calendar Description: The transformation of basic assumptions in several intellectual and aesthetic disciplines in European thought from 1870 through the First World War.
Prerequisites: AP/HIST 1060 6.00 or AP/HIST 2300 6.00 or AP/HIST 2400 6.00 or AP/HIST 3300 6.00 or AP/HIST 3311 3.00 or AP/HIST 3315 3.00 or AP/HIST 3320 6.00 or AP/HIST 3365 3.00 or AP/HIST 3385 3.00 or AP/HIST 3480 6.00 or departmental permission. Course credit exclusions: None.  Open to: This course is restricted to History Honours majors and minors who have successfully completed at least 84 credits. PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusion: AS/HIST 4350 6.00.

Expanded Course Description:

A study of the idea of modernity and how it is understood in the nineteenth century and the first half of the twentieth century. We will first look at concepts of modernity and modernism in Marshall Berman’s important work All That is Solid Melts into Air. Readings in the nineteenth century include works by Mary Shelley, Goethe, Marx and Engels, Baudelaire, and Dostoyevsky. We will then focus on the period 1880-1920 and the growth of modernist thought. For this period we will read works by Nietzsche, Freud, Mann, Zamiatin and Einstein. Special focus will be placed on the new art of modernism, including works by the Impressionists, Post-Impressionists, Fauves, Cubists, Surrealists and those in the Dada movement.

Students will write one short essay and one longer essay, both supervised closely by the instructor.

Tentative Grade Breakdown/Overview of Assessment:

Short paper in first term: 10%
Visual art collaborative assignment and presentation in second term: 15%
Major paper and presentation in second term: 30% and 10%=40%
Cumulative contribution to seminar discussions: 20%
Examination: 15%

NOTE: Prior to buying textbooks, students should consult the detailed course outline which will give the final versions of the weekly syllabus and the detailed breakdown of assignments with weighting and due dates.  The course outline will be posted in Moodle and discussed on the first day of class.

More information:  http://history.laps.yorku.ca/

AP/HIST 4360 6.0A: Europe Between the Wars, 1918-1939

Course Director:  A. Bargain, abargain@yorku.ca

Problems such as political ideologies, militarism, economic instability, youth movements and class roles in modernization, studied comparatively across frontiers wherever possible. Course credit exclusion: AP/HIST 4030 6.00. Prior TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusions: AS/HIST 4030 6.00., AS/HIST 4360 6.00.

AP/HIST 4420 6.0A: Great Britain in the 20th Century

Course Director: D. Cousins, dcousins@yorku.ca

Course Calendar Description: Examines various topics in 19th Century British History at an advanced level. It is designed to intensify students' knowledge of the history of the British Isles in all its many facets. Prerequisites: AP/HIST 2400 6.00 or AP/HIST 3415 6.00 or AP/HIST 3420 6.00 or AP/HIST 4450 6.00 or AP/EN 3550 6.00 or AP/EN 4003 6.00 or departmental permission. Course credit exclusion: None. Open to: This course is restricted to History Honours majors and minors who have successfully completed at least 84 credits. PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusion: AK/HIST 4520 6.00

AP/HIST 4511 6.0A: Themes in Canadian Social and Cultural History

Course Director:  M. Arsenault, arsm0034@yorku.ca

Course Calendar Description: This course focuses upon such themes as social change, the formation of new social and economic groups, and the development of social institutions and patterns of thought. Note: Priority is given to History or Canadian Studies Honours majors and minors who have successfully completed at least 84 credits. Prerequisites: AP/HIST 1050 6.00 or AP/HIST 1086 6.00 or AP/HIST 2500 6.00 or AP/CDNS 2200 6.00 and AP/HIST 3531 6.00 or AP/HIST 3533 6.00 or AP/HIST 3535 6.00 or AP/HIST 3546 6.00 or AP/HIST 3555 6.00 or AP/HIST 3580 6.00 or AP/HIST 3581 6.00 or AP/HIST 3582 6.00 or AP/HIST 3591 6.00 or AP/HIST 3838 6.00 or AP/HIST 3850 6.00 or AP/SOSC 3210 6.00 or departmental permission. Course credit exclusions: None. PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusions: AK/HIST 4200 6.00, AS/HIST 4511 6.00 (prior to Fall/Winter 1994-1995).

AP/HIST 4515 6.0A: Murder in the Archives: Researching the Social History of Homicides in Ontario, 1815-1982

Course Director: W. Wicken, 2192 Vari Hall, (416)736-2100 x66963, wwicken@yorku.ca

This is a research course, which examines the social history of homicide in Ontario from 1815 to 1982. Each student is required to write a major research paper on a homicide occurring within the Province of Ontario. This paper is based principally on printed and archival sources. In order to assist this research, students are instructed on using online sources as well as archival repositories in the GTA and surrounding area. In the first term, students meet with the instructor and are given weekly assignments, which will form the basis for in class discussions. These assignments provide students guidance on using various types of quantitative and qualitative sources. Quantitative sources, such as the federal census of 1871, provincial vital statistics, and parish registers are used. Qualitative sources, such as newspapers, benchbooks, and coroner's inquests are also used. In the second term, the class moves to the Archives of Ontario where students research their essay and where the instructor assists in deciphering and interpreting documents.  Though students are not required to use other repositories in the GTA, such as the United Church Archives and the City of Toronto Archives, they are encouraged to do so.

Note: Priority is given to History Honours Majors and Minors who have successfully completed at least 84 credits.

AP/HIST 4530 6.0A: The Development of Toronto

Course Director: TBA

Course Calendar Description:
Toronto from its earliest beginnings to recent times, population increase, social change, economic development, metropolitan dominance, religion, and political life of the city. Note: Priority is given to History, Canadian Studies or Urban Studies Honours majors and minors who have successfully completed at least 84 credits. PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusion: AS/HIST 4530 6.00.

AP/HIST 4581 6.0A: Worry and Wonder: Jewish Politics, Society and Religion in Canada

Course Director: D. Koffman, 722 Kaneff Tower, 416-736-2100 ext. 77395, koffman@yorku.ca

Special Features:
This seminar blends discussion, lectures, and workshop-style feedback on student-driven new research. It features at a guest lecture, visits to archives, screenings of film scenes, and opportunities to discover and analyze artifacts from the past. Each student will develop an original scholarly research project based on her/his own interests.  Bit by bit over the course of the year, and with help from the instructor, professional archivists at the Ontario Jewish Archives (located close to campus) and the instructor, each student will produce a new contribution to what the world knows about Canadian Jewish life.  Final projects can take the form of an essay, which may be published on the OJA website, a podcast, or another non-traditional final form.

Course Calendar Description:
This public history seminar explores the origins, development and paradoxes of the Canadian Jewish community from its inception in the 18th century to the present. It pays particular attention to the complexities of immigration, relationships between Jews and non-Jews, inspiration and anxiety about religious change, the Holocaust, Zionism & the State of Israel in public consciousness, and the puzzles and tensions of balancing tradition and modernity.

No prior knowledge of Jewish history or Canadian history required.

Course credit exclusions: AP/HIST 3555 6.00. Prior TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusion: AS/HIST 3555 6.00.
Note: Priority is given to History Honours majors and minors who have successfully completed at least 84 credits.

Expanded Course Description:
This course will outline the dynamic, ever-changing Canadian Jewish experience from the colonial era orbit, through the turn of the digital age - some 250 years.  It explores the great diversity of Canadian Jewry: its variety in ethnicity, class and religious practice, its regional variations in small towns, farms, factory & mining towns, and in roaring cities, coast to coast.  The course emphasizes the ruptures and wonders of mass migration, religious and political tensions among Canadian Jews from the 1940s through the 1980s, and the ways in which Jews negotiated relationships with non-Jews in Canada, as well as its politics, its landscape, its race relations, its religious spheres, and eventually, its embrace of multiculturalism. It will touch on Canadian Jewry’s relations with the state of Israel, anti-Semitism, and the political, economic and cultural contributions Jews have made to Canadian life, always placing the Canadian Jewish experience in the broader context of global Jewish life.

This is a lecture, discussion & research course and workshop; there is content to learn, and there are professional and practical skills to develop.  During the first term, lectures and discussions will be punctuated with trips to nearby archives. Throughout the course you will engage with guest speakers, short films, and hands-on work with primary sources including newspapers, memoirs, obituaries, photographs, maps, poetry, and other archival and cultural materials.  Throughout the year, the instructor and archivists (at the Ontario Jewish Archives) will help students develop, revise, and present original research based on students' own unique interests, thereby adding new knowledge of and understanding to Canadian Jewish life.

By the end of the course, I hope you will have:

  • Satisfied some of your own goals in taking this class.
  • Learned or improved the skills of a historian so as to:
    • Find and analyze primary sources to “make” history
    • Gain basic competency in archives
    • Research, write and edit an original scholarly argument.
  • Acquired knowledge and insight about Canadian Jewish history so as to:
    • Be able to intelligently assimilate new facts / perspectives about Canadian Jewry when then come up in your life in the future
    • Be able to apply your knowledge about Canadian Jewry to the experiences – similarities and differences – with other minority ethnic and/or religious groups in Canada
    • Have a clear sense of the broad arch of modern Jewish history and something of the unique nature of the Canadian version of it

Tentative Grade Breakdown/Overview of assessment:

First Semester:
Find and Discuss a Primary Source, 5%
Analyzing the Field, 10%
First-Semester Quiz, 7.5%
Research Proposal, 10%
Participation, 7.5%

Second Semester:     
Research Paper, 15%
Peer Review, 5%
Second-Semester Quiz.  7.5%
Revisions of Research Paper, 15%
Presentation, 5%
Final Edits, Submission to OJA, 5%
Participation, 7.5%

NOTE: Prior to buying textbooks, students should consult the detailed course outline which will give the final versions of the weekly syllabus and the detailed breakdown of assignments with weighting and due dates.  The course outline will be posted in Moodle and discussed on the first day of class.

More information:  http://history.laps.yorku.ca/

AP/HIST 4699 6.0A: Selected Topics In US History

Course Director: B. Cothran, 2132 Vari Hall, (416)736-2100 x 66959, cothran@yorku.ca

Research seminar on selected topics in US history. Topics vary from year to year. Please consult the History supplemental calendar for more details.

This course is restricted to History Honours majors and minors who have successfully completed at least 84 credits. Prerequisites: AP/HIST 2600 6.00 or AP/HIST 3601 6.00 or AP/HIST 3602 6.00 or AP/HIST 3610 6.00 or AP/HIST 3622 3.00 or AP/HIST 3625 3.00 or AP/HIST 3692 6.00 or AP/HUMA 2325 6.00 or departmental permission.

Course credit exclusions: None. PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusion: AS/HIST 4699 6.00.

AP/HIST 4725 6.0A: Topics in Modern Caribbean History

Course Director: D. Trotman, 326 Founders College, (416)736-2100 x 33192, dtrotman@yorku.ca

Course Calendar Description:
This course examines topics in the development of the Caribbean, 1938-1983, from the labour riots of the thirties to the American intervention in Grenada. It includes a Pan-Caribbean examination of economic, political and socio-cultural developments in this period.
This course is restricted to History or Latin American and Caribbean Studies Honours majors and minors who have successfully completed at least 84 credits. Prerequisites: AP/HIST 2730 6.00 or AP/HIST 3480 6.00 or AP/HUMA 2310 9.00 or departmental permission. Course credit exclusions: None.

Expanded Course Description:
Migrations and the creation of Caribbean Diasporas,1900-c.1980

This year (F/W2017-18) the seminar on the Modern Caribbean will focus on the creation and development of Caribbean communities in Europe (the United Kingdom, France and the Netherlands), North America (the United States and Canada), and Central America (Costa Rica and Panama).

Historically the Caribbean region has been the recipient of voluntary and involuntary migrants: as settlers, refugees, and enslaved and indentured labour from Europe, Africa and Asia. The Caribbean has also experienced intra-regional migrations (between islands and from island territories to mainland countries of Central America) and extra-regional migrations to Europe and mainland North America.

The seminar focuses on the emigrations of pre-and post-World War 2 and the first generations of Caribbean communities outside of the region. The seminar discusses the “push and pull” factors which generated these emigrations, and examines the political and economic problems of settlement, the demographic make-up, the social and cultural challenges, and the achievements of those emigrants.

All of the readings for this course will be available online, on Moodle and on reserve at YUL.

Students  who require a general narrative to fill gaps in their knowledge of the Caribbean are strongly recommended to read
F.W. Knight, The Caribbean: The Genesis of a Fragmented Nationalism (Oxford,1990)
B.W. Higman, A Concise History of the Caribbean (Cambridge,2011)
prior to the course. These texts are available in public libraries or can be purchased online from reputable booksellers.

This is a Seminar and not a lecture Course. Although the instructor will occasionally provide some background and contextual orientations, the emphasis in this course is on discussion of assigned readings, active seminar participation and presentations.  A major component of the course is on preparation for a research paper to be presented in the second term when the course assumes a conference format.

Tentative Grade Breakdown/Overview of Assessment:
Participation 20%; Presentations 20%; Minor paper 20%; Major research Paper 40%

NOTE: The detailed course outline will give the final versions of the weekly syllabus and the detailed breakdown of assignments with weighting and due dates.  The course outline will be posted in Moodle and discussed on the first day of class.

More information:  http://history.laps.yorku.ca/

AP/HIST 4765 6.0A: Rethinking Gender in East Asian History

Course Director:  J. Kim, 706 Kaneff Tower , (416)736-2100 x30402, jkim@yorku.ca

This course uses a cultural historical approach to examine the question of Chinese modernity. It focuses on the processes, technologies, and social agents that transformed Chinese culture in the tumultuous period from the first Opium War in 1842 to the 1949 Communist Revolution. The course begins with an introduction to cultural historical methodology. We read key theoretical works in this field, most of which are focused on European or North American history. We then study how scholars of China have applied, adapted, or elaborated on this methodology in their studies of late imperial (1842-1911) and Republican China (1912-1949). Prerequisites: AP/HIST 2710 6.00 or AP/HIST 3760 6.00 or AP/HIST 3761 3.00 or AP/HIST 3770 6.00 or AP/HIST 3771 3.00 or AP/HIST 3772 3.00 or AP/HIST 3775 3.00 or AP/HUMA 2420 9.00 or AP/HUMA 2430 9.00 or AP/HUMA 2435 9.00 or AP/HUMA 3500 6.00 or AP/HUMA 3505 3.00 or AP/HUMA 3506 3.00 or AP/HUMA 3510 6.00. Course credit exclusions: None. Open to: History and East Asian Studies Honours Majors and Minors who have successfully completed at least 84 credits.

AP/HIST 4799 6.0A: Selected Topics in African History

Course Director:  J. Curto, 315 York Lanes, (416) 736-2100 x66965, jccurto@yorku.ca

Course Calendar Description: Research seminar on selected topics in African history. Topics vary from year to year. Please consult the History supplemental calendar for more details.  This course is restricted to History and African Studies Honours majors and minors who have successfully completed at least 84 credits. Prerequisites:  AP/HIST 2750 6.00 or AP/HIST 3780 6.00 or AP/SOSC 2480 9.00 or AP/HIST 3480 6.00 or departmental permission. Course credit exclusions: None.  PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusion: AS/HIST 4799 6.00.

Expanded Course Description:
During 2017-2018, the topic selected for this seminar is Women in Africa from Precolonial times to the Present. The seminar explores local and external social, cultural, and political factors that have shaped and continue to shape the experiences of women throughout Africa. Its time span covers the precolonial period, the colonial era, the post-independence epoch, as well as the present. Special attention is given to women’s agency and initiative, as well as their subordination and struggles. Topics for discussion include the problem and relevance of gender in African History, the power and legitimacy of some women during the precolonial era, women as both slaves and slave-holders/owners, precolonial women and their families, women and the emerging colonial state, prostitution, changing marital patterns, unruly females, and women and music during the twentieth century, as well as women in the new South Africa. In the process, students will be introduced to the theories and methods used in the reconstruction of the history of African women.

Tentative Grade Breakdown/Overview of Assessment:

Book Review 1: 10%
Research Essay (1st draft): 20%
Book Review 2: 10%
Research Essay (final draft): 30%
Student Essay Presentations: 10%
Class Participation: 20%

NOTE: Prior to buying textbooks, students should consult the detailed course outline which will give the final versions of the weekly syllabus and the detailed breakdown of assignments with weighting and due dates.  The course outline will be posted in Moodle and discussed on the first day of class.

More information:  http://history.laps.yorku.ca/

AP/HIST 4800 6.0A: The Science of Society: Social Thought in North America, 1890-1940

Course Director:  M. Shore, VH 2184, (416)736-2100 x66975, mshore@yorku.ca

Special Features: Second Semester Poster presentations of research essays in mini-conference style

Course Calendar Description: This course presents an analysis of the intellectual, cultural and social changes which contributed to the rise of the social sciences and re-organization of the liberal arts in North America during the period 1890-1940. By focusing on this context as well as major theories and trends in several disciplines, this course will provide insight into modern North American culture.

Priority is given to History, Humanities and Social & Political Thought Honours majors and minors who have successfully completed at least 84 credits.

PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusion: AS/HIST 4800 6.00, AS/HUMA 4220 6.00.

Expanded Course Description:

a) The period 1890 to 1940 saw a major shift in social and cultural thought in North America because of war, economic development, industrial and technological change, urbanization, immigration, scientific and medical developments. A wide array of individuals and institutions in psychology, criminology, anthropology, social work, sociology, economics, political science, home economics, literature, history, religion, law, consumerism, advertising, and popular culture wrestled with the impact of these changes and tried to devise new ideas about identity, community, society, and concepts of nation and commemoration. This course focuses on these developments as a means to understand Canadian and American culture and society in the late nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Readings and discussions examine the currents of thought in each of these areas, and in related movements for social reform. Students will deal with a wide variety of texts, including novels, and analyses of culture and popular culture. A highlight of the course is the second term class mini-conference consisting of poster presentations from all of the seminar participants.

Topics to be treated over the 24-week period include:

Social and economic change at the turn of the century; the World's Columbian Exposition, 1893, and American society; the birth of modern culture; social disorder, behaviour, and crime; Darwinism and Spiritualism; religion and social reform; the rise of home economics; women, work, and consumerism; ideas of empire; moral reform and the family; self-culture and self-help; commercial culture and marketing; nature versus nurture debates; representations of difference; scientific management and efficiency; food, consumption, and social structures.

b) Titles of some of the readings that will figure prominently in the course:

Manliness and Civilization; The Alienist: A Novel; Reluctant Modernism; Cheaper By the Dozen; The Mismeasure of Man; The Big Oyster: History on the Half Shell;  The Devil in the White City:  Murder, Magic, and Madness at the Fair That Changed America; The Making of Middlebrow Culture; All the World's a Fair: Visions of Empire at American International Expositions, 1876-1916; Perfection Salad: Women and Cooking at the Turn of the Century; Ladies of Labor; Girls of Adventure.

c) A prime learning objective of this course is to provide students with an understanding of the developments that gave shape to current social and political issues, debates, and controversies.

A prime learning activity is the poster presentation, a period of four seminars in which students will engage in a conference-like setting. In these sessions, students will have the opportunity to present their research findings as exhibits (consisting of visual and written material) and discuss these with their colleagues. This activity provides practice in such professional skills as public speaking, lecturing, and engaging in question-and-answer periods.

Tentative Grade Breakdown/Overview of Assessment:

1 analytical review essay (1st term) -- 20%
1 major research essay (2nd term), consisting of poster presentation (10%) and final written paper (30%)
Seminar leadership (1 per term) -- 10% x 2 = 20%
Weekly seminar attendance, participation, and contribution (both terms) -- 20%

NOTE: Prior to buying textbooks, students should consult the detailed course outline which will give the final versions of the weekly syllabus and the detailed breakdown of assignments with weighting and due dates.  The course outline will be discussed on the first day of class.

More information:  http://history.laps.yorku.ca/

AP/HIST 4840 6.0A: Public History

Course Director: J. Bonnell, 2130 Vari Hall, 416-736-2100 ext. 30422, bonnellj@yorku.ca

Special Features: This course has a significant workplace-integrated experiential education component. In term 2, students will be assigned to museum or archive within the Greater Toronto Area to complete a 12-week placement (ten hours/week) resulting in the completion of a public history “product” (for example, a podcast, walking tour, exhibition, or online content).

Course Calendar Description: This course examines the forms, goals, and practices of making history in museums, archives, historic sites, and other institutions of public history. It enables students to learn the meaning and methods in the production of memory and introduces them to the practical skills for the public presentation of historical knowledge. The course combines analytical study with a part-time placement in a public-history site.

Note: Priority is given to History Honours Majors and Minors who have successfully completed at least 84 credits.

Expanded Course Description:
Public history investigates the ways that history is understood by and interpreted for the public. This course examines the history, theory, and practice of public history in a wide variety of venues, including museums, archives, historic sites, the internet, and film. Key topics will include collective memory and nation-building, questions of race, gender, and ethnicity in the representation of public history, commemorating war, and the presentation of “difficult” histories in museums and other venues.

In addition to class readings and discussions, focused workshops throughout the course will introduce students to the practical skills for the public presentation of historical knowledge, including oral history interview techniques, communication and presentation skills, and digital tools for public history. Students will meet practitioners in the field and visit several public history-related sites.

At the end of this course, students will be able to identify key debates within the scholarly literature on public history and describe how these debates have changed over time. Through course assignments and the term 2 placement experience, student will also gain concrete skills in the following areas:

  • Collaborating and communicating in a professional manner with institutions and/or community organizations
  • Conducting independent research on a specific topic using primary sources in archives, libraries, and heritage sites
  • Devising a public history project by exploring and synthesizing a wide range of sources, crafting a narrative about the past, and presenting it in an accessible and creative manner (podcast, journalistic news article, walking tour, short film, etc.)

Course readings: TBA. Most, if not all, of the course readings will be available freely to student through the course Moodle site.

Tentative Grade Breakdown/Overview of Assessment:
Participation: 20%
Letter of Introduction (25 September): 5%
Podcast Proposal (16 October): 5%
Final Podcast (27 November): 15%
Research Project Proposal and Workplan (22 January): 5%
Research Paper: (19 March): 20%
Final Project Presentation (2 April): 10%
Final Public History Project: (5 April): 20%

NOTE: Prior to buying textbooks, students should consult the detailed course outline which will give the final versions of the weekly syllabus and the detailed breakdown of assignments with weighting and due dates.  The course outline will be posted in Moodle and discussed on the first day of class.

More information:  http://history.laps.yorku.ca/

AP/HIST 4990 3.0A (F), AP/HIST 4990 3.0M (W), AP/HIST 4990 6.0A: Supervised Reading and Research

This course is normally open only to majors of exceptional ability (defined as a B+ or higher average in History) with the permission of the Chair or Director of Undergraduate Studies. Students may take no more than six credits under this course rubric.

To apply for permission to do History 4990, students must submit a formal application to the Director of Undergraduate Studies, normally at the beginning of Term. Application forms (available in Vari Hall 2140) require: a brief course description and rationale; a proposed evaluation breakdown (at least 60% of the final grade must be based on written work); a list of relevant History courses completed and in-progress; a representative bibliography (with a minimum of 20 titles listed in standard academic format); and the name and signature of the supervisor (who must normally be full-time faculty in the Department of History). Students are responsible for finding Department members willing to serve as supervisor.

The Chair or Director of Undergraduate Studies must be satisfied that the subject of History 4990 is demonstrably distinct and separate from that of any other course taken by the student. History 4990 may be supervised by the instructor in another of the student’s courses.

The detailed programme of study will be determined by the student and the supervisor. Students are expected to prepare a substantial amount of written work. The student’s final grade will be based primarily (at least 60%) on the assessment of the written work by the course.

Normally, in any one year, no instructor may supervise more than a total of three courses under the rubrics of AP/HIST 4000 6.0 (Honours Essay), AP/HIST 4990 6.0 (Supervised Reading and Research), or AP/HIST 3990 6.0 (Supervised Reading and Research).

  • Students may take directed reading courses only after having successfully completed (passed)
  • 24 credits in the Faculty of Liberal Arts & Professional Studies.
  • The maximum permissible number of directed reading courses depends on a student’s program type. Students in Honours BA programs may take 24 such credits; students in a BA program may take 18 such credits.
  • Within their last 30 credits, students may take a maximum of 12 credits in directed reading courses.
  • Students may take a maximum of 12 credits of directed reading courses with the same faculty member.

AP/HIST 4991 3.0A (F), AP/HIST 4991 3.0M (W), AP/HIST 4991 6.0A - Advanced Seminar in History

Fourth-year students who have an average in their major of B+ or better may be allowed to register in some 5000-level courses in the Graduate Programme in History. As with 4000-level courses, admission is at the course director’s discretion. Undergraduates in such courses will have the same workload as their graduate classmates.

The History Department will record the enrolment as AP/HIST4991 6.0/3.0, Advanced Seminar in History, on the student’s transcript, and it will count as a 4000-level seminar. On request, the department will attest, on letterhead, that History 4991 is a graduate-level course. For further information and permission to enrol, see the Director of Undergraduate Studies.