4000 Level Courses

AP/HIST 4000 6.0A: Honours Essay

The course is normally open only to majors of exceptional ability (defined as a B+ or higher average in History). It counts as a seminar.

Students must apply for permission to do an Honours Essay by submitting at the beginning of Fall Term a formal letter to the Department Chair accompanied by written recommendations from two Department faculty members. The letter should outline the relevant course work that has prepared the student for an Honours Essay, the primary and secondary research that will be undertaken (including a bibliography), and the schedule of work. The letter should also indicate which Department faculty member will supervise the student’s work and which Department faculty member is suggested as second reader. The faculty recommenders may serve as supervisor and second reader. Students are responsible for finding Department faculty members willing to serve as supervisor and suggested second reader. The second reader is officially appointed at the discretion of the Chair.

The following timetable is recommended:

  • 15 November: Detailed Outline
  • 1 December: Progress Report
  • 15 February: First Draft
  • 30 March: Submission Deadline

The Honours Essay must be submitted to the supervisor and second reader by 30 March. A bound copy on 8 1/2" x 11" white bond paper must also be submitted to the Chair of the Department by 30 March. The copy will be retained by the Department. Normally, the essay will be between 70 and 125 double-spaced pages, although shorter essays may be acceptable depending on the type of research undertaken.
The Honours Essay will be read by both the supervisor and the second reader. The grading of the essay will be based on the following categories:

A+     excellent
A        superior
B+     very good
B        good
C+     acceptable honors
C        acceptable non-honors
D        poor
F        failure

Should the grades assigned by the supervisor and the second reader not differ by more than one category (e.g., B and B+), the higher grade will stand. When there is a discrepancy of two or more grades assigned by the supervisor and the second reader (e.g., A and B), a third reader will be appointed by the Chair. In such instances the grade for the essay will be the average of the two highest grades.

Along with the grade assigned for the essay, the supervisor and second reader will submit a brief written report that comments on the content, style, organization, and originality of the essay. The Chair reserves the right to require an oral examination on the essay. In such instances, the examining board will comprise of the supervisor, the second reader, and a third person appointed by the Chair. The final course grade will be decided by these three persons. Examiners will submit their reports to the Chair within two weeks.

Students may take AP/HIST 4000 6.0 with instructors in whose fourth-year seminar they are enrolled. In such cases, it is understood that the seminar and the Honours Essay course are separate, each with its own requirements.

AP/HIST 4053 6.0A: North American Immigration and Ethnic History

Course Director:  F. Sturino, 143 Founders College, (416)736-2100 x33251, fsturino@yorku.ca

Course Calendar Description: This course focuses on changing public attitudes, government policy, and immigrants' social, economic and political life in North America from its origins to the present. The course critically examines the historiography of North American immigration and ethnic studies, and encourages comparative analysis. Open to: History or Canadian Studies Honours majors and minors who have successfully completed at least 84 credits.

AP/HIST 4061 6.0A: Race and Politics in America Since the Second World War

Course Director:  K. Boyd, 2126 Vari Hall, (416)736-2100 x40609, kendrab@yorku.ca

Course Calendar Description: This course examines the different forms of black political action in the United States since the Second World War and assesses the effectiveness of each in reducing racial discrimination and poverty. Note: Priority is given to History or Social & Political Thought Honours majors and minors who have successfully completed at least 84 credits. Course credit exclusion: AP/HIST 4690 6.00. PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusions: AS/HIST 4061 6.00, AS/HIST 4690 6.00

AP/HIST 4116 6.0A: Alexander and Great: Myth and Reality

Course Director:  J. Trevett, 2180 Vari Hall, (416)736-2100 x30409, jtrevett@yorku.ca

Course Calendar Description: This course studies the life of Alexander the Great. It seeks to set his achievements within the context of Greek, Macedonian and Near Eastern history, and to disentangle the truth about him from the often unreliable and conflicting sources. Prerequisites: AP/HIST 2100 6.00 or AP/HUMA 3100 6.00 or AP/HUMA 3102 3.00 or AP/HUMA 3104 6.00 or AP/HUMA 3105 6.00 or AP/HUMA 3110 6.00 and AP/HIST 3120 6.00 or AP/HIST 3125 3.00 or AP/HIST 3130 6.00 or AP/HIST 3131 6.00 or AP/HIST 3135 3.00 or AP/HIST 3140 3.00 or AP/HIST 3150 6.00 or AP/HIST 3152 6.00 or AP/HIST 3153 6.00 or AP/HIST 3154 3.00 or AP/HIST 3160 6.00 or departmental permission. Open to: Priority is given to History, Classical Studies or Hellenic Studies Honours majors and minors who have successfully completed at least 84 credits.

AP/HIST 4230 6.0A: Technologies of Communication: A History of Reading from the Codex to the Kindle

Course Director:  M. Schotte, 2138 Vari Hall, (416)736-2100 x30418, mschotte@yorku.ca

“The Book Wheel” A. Ramelli, Le diverse et artificiose machine del Capitano Agostino Ramelli (1588) Image credit: http://smithsonianlibraries.tumblr.com/

“The Book Wheel”
A. Ramelli, Le diverse et artificiose machine
del Capitano Agostino Ramelli (1588)
Image credit: http://smithsonianlibraries.tumblr.com/

 

Course Calendar Description: This research seminar explores the history of books and their readers from antiquity to the present. Class is held in York's Clara Thomas Archives & Special Collections, and includes trips to other area libraries. By studying books as material objects and communication technologies, we will investigate questions of intellectual property, literacy, author and audience, and "the future of the book." Prerequisites: None. Co-requisites: None. Course credit exclusions: AP/WRIT4720 6.0; prior to 2009, AP/HIST 4260 6.00 (FW14 & FW15 only). Priority is given to History Honours majors and minors who have successfully completed at least 84 credits.

 

 

 

AP/HIST 4360 6.0A: Europe Between the Wars, 1918-1939

Course Director:  TBA

Course Calendar Description: Problems such as political ideologies, militarism, economic instability, youth movements and class roles in modernization, studied comparatively across frontiers wherever possible. Course credit exclusion: AP/HIST 4030 6.00.

 

AP/HIST 4470 6.0A: War, Sex and Drink: Modern Britain in the Archives

Course Director:  S. Brooke, 2188 Vari Hall, (416)736-2100 x66980, sjbrooke@yorku.ca

Course Calendar Description:  This course uses digital archives to analyze the historical experience of Britain from the 1880s to the 1980s. Topics covered include popular culture in late Victorian London, urban poverty, the First World War, working-class culture between the wars, sexual attitudes in the 1940s, the Second World War, the British empire, youth and popular culture in the 1960s, women’s liberation and the Thatcher years.

Prerequisites: Students need 84 credits to apply and must have fulfilled a 1000-level
requirement. Priority is given to History Honours majors and minors who have successfully completed at least 84 credits and fulfilled a 1000-level requirement.

 

AP/HIST 4511 6.0A: Themes in Canadian Social and Cultural History

Course Director:  TBA

Course Calendar Description: This course focuses upon such themes as social change, the formation of new social and economic groups, and the development of social institutions and patterns of thought. Note: Priority is given to History or Canadian Studies Honours majors and minors who have successfully completed at least 84 credits.

AP/HIST 4520 6.0A: Metis History in North America: From the Ethnogenesis of a New People in the 17th-Century Fur Trade to their Fight for Rights in the 21st Century

Course Director:  C. Podruchny, 718 Kaneff Tower, carolynp@yorku.ca

Course Calendar Description: This course studies the history of Métis in North America from the meeting of Indigenous women and European fur traders in 1630 to court cases of Métis rights in the 21st century. It examines the emergence of distinct ethnic groups that blended European and indigenous traditions, and the transformation of Métis into a political collectivity recognized in the Canadian constitution. Open to: History and Multicultural and Indigenous Studies Majors and Minors Note: Priority is given to History and Multicultural and Indigenous Studies Honours majors and minors who have successfully completed at least 84 credits.

 

AP/HIST 4565 6.0A: Cultural Revolution: The 1960s in Canada

Course Director: M. Martel, 2166 Vari Hall, (416)736-2100 x30429, mmartel@yorku.ca

Course Calendar Description: The 1960s have influenced the collective memory of Canadians. Although this course focuses on Canadian society, the international context is taken into account. This course is intended to provide students with an opportunity to study an era in Canadian history -- the decade of the 1960s-- by analyzing its cultural, economic, ideological, political, and social aspects. It pays attention to several phenomena that were instrumental in shaping the 1960s: the cultural revolution, the Hippies, University protest, the feminist movement, the protest movements in Europe and in the United States and their impact on Canada, the transformation of the political culture, the development of the Welfare State, and the rise of the independence movement in Quebec. Priority is given to History Honours majors and minors who have successfully completed at least 84 credits. Prerequisite: Students must have successfully completed 84 credits. Course credit exclusions: AP/HIST 4052 6.00

AP/HIST 4755 6.0A: Cultural and Social History of Colonial Latin America

Course Director:  A. Durston, 827 Kaneff Tower , (416)736-2100 x66962, durston@yorku.ca

Course Calendar Description: Comparative analysis of the cultures and societies of Colonial Latin America; discussion of the historical process of reinventing, reinterpreting and negotiating the colonial reality. Note: Priority is given to History Honours majors and minors who have successfully completed at least 84 credits. Prior TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusion: AS/HIST 4755 6.00.

AP/HIST 4765 6.0A: Rethinking Gender in East Asian History

Course Director:  J. Kim, 706 Kaneff Tower , (416)736-2100 x30402, jkim@yorku.ca

Course Calendar Description: Examines gender roles in pre-modern and modern China, Korea and Japan. It focuses on women: their places in the family and society, their relationships with one another and men, and the evolution of ideas about gender. Note: Priority is given to History or East Asian Studies Honours majors and minors who have successfully completed at least 84 credits.

 

AP/HIST 4770 6.0A: The African Urban Past: From the Pre-colonial Era to the Present

Course Director:  J. Curto, 315 York Lanes , (416)736-2100 x66965, jccurto@yorku.ca

Course Calendar Description: This course examines Africa's urban past. It first concentrates on precolonial cities as centres of political organization, religious learning, regional and long-distance trade and, thereafter, on urban health, crime, women, crowds, squatters, workers and political movements during the colonial and post-independence eras. Prerequisites: AP/HIST 2750 6.00 or AP/HIST 3780 6.00 or AP/SOSC 2480 9.00 or AP/HIST 3480 6.00 or departmental permission. Course credit exclusions: None. Open to: This course is restricted to History and African Studies Honours majors and minors who have successfully completed at least 84 credits. PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusion: AS/HIST 4770 6.00.

AP/HIST 4800 6.0A: The Science of Society: Social Thought in North America, 1890-1940

Course Director:  M. Shore, 2184 Vari Hall, (416)736-2100 x66975, mshore@yorku.ca

Course Calendar Description: This course presents an analysis of the intellectual, cultural and social changes which contributed to the rise of the social sciences and re-organization of the liberal arts in North America during the period 1890-1940. By focusing on this context as well as major theories and trends in several disciplines, this course will provide insight into modern North American culture. Priority is given to History, Humanities and Social & Political Thought Honours majors and minors who have successfully completed at least 84 credits.

AP/HIST 4840 6.0A: Public History

Course Director: J. Bonnell, 2130 Vari Hall, 416-736-2100 x30422, bonnellj@yorku.ca

Course Calendar Description: This course examines the forms, goals, and practices of making history in museums, archives, historic sites, and other institutions of public history. It enables students to learn the meaning and methods in the production of memory and introduces them to the practical skills for the public presentation of historical knowledge. The course combines analytical study with a part-time placement in a public-history site. Course credit exclusion: GL/HIST 4310 6.0 Note: Priority is given to History Honours Majors and Minors who have successfully completed at least 84 credits.

AP/HIST 4990 3.0A (F), AP/HIST 4990 3.0M (W), AP/HIST 4990 6.0A: Supervised Reading and Research

This course is normally open only to majors of exceptional ability (defined as a B+ or higher average in History) with the permission of the Chair or Director of Undergraduate Studies. Students may take no more than six credits under this course rubric.

To apply for permission to do History 4990, students must submit a formal application to the Director of Undergraduate Studies, normally at the beginning of Term. Application forms (available in Vari Hall 2140) require: a brief course description and rationale; a proposed evaluation breakdown (at least 60% of the final grade must be based on written work); a list of relevant History courses completed and in-progress; a representative bibliography (with a minimum of 20 titles listed in standard academic format); and the name and signature of the supervisor (who must normally be full-time faculty in the Department of History). Students are responsible for finding Department members willing to serve as supervisor.

The Chair or Director of Undergraduate Studies must be satisfied that the subject of History 4990 is demonstrably distinct and separate from that of any other course taken by the student. History 4990 may be supervised by the instructor in another of the student’s courses.

The detailed programme of study will be determined by the student and the supervisor. Students are expected to prepare a substantial amount of written work. The student’s final grade will be based primarily (at least 60%) on the assessment of the written work by the course.

Normally, in any one year, no instructor may supervise more than a total of three courses under the rubrics of AP/HIST 4000 6.0 (Honours Essay), AP/HIST 4990 6.0 (Supervised Reading and Research), or AP/HIST 3990 6.0 (Supervised Reading and Research).

  • Students may take directed reading courses only after having successfully completed (passed)
  • 24 credits in the Faculty of Liberal Arts & Professional Studies.
  • The maximum permissible number of directed reading courses depends on a student’s program type. Students in Honours BA programs may take 24 such credits; students in a BA program may take 18 such credits.
  • Within their last 30 credits, students may take a maximum of 12 credits in directed reading courses.
  • Students may take a maximum of 12 credits of directed reading courses with the same faculty member.

AP/HIST 4991 3.0A (F), AP/HIST 4991 3.0M (W), AP/HIST 4991 6.0A - Advanced Seminar in History

Fourth-year students who have an average in their major of B+ or better may be allowed to register in some 5000-level courses in the Graduate Programme in History. As with 4000-level courses, admission is at the course director’s discretion. Undergraduates in such courses will have the same workload as their graduate classmates.

The History Department will record the enrolment as AP/HIST4991 6.0/3.0, Advanced Seminar in History, on the student’s transcript, and it will count as a 4000-level seminar. On request, the department will attest, on letterhead, that History 4991 is a graduate-level course. For further information and permission to enrol, see the Director of Undergraduate Studies.