4000 Level Courses

AP/HIST 4000 6.0A: Honours Essay

The course is normally open only to majors of exceptional ability (defined as a B+ or higher average in History). It counts as a seminar.

Students must apply for permission to do an Honours Essay by submitting at the beginning of Fall Term a formal letter to the Department Chair accompanied by written recommendations from two Department faculty members. The letter should outline the relevant course work that has prepared the student for an Honours Essay, the primary and secondary research that will be undertaken (including a bibliography), and the schedule of work. The letter should also indicate which Department faculty member will supervise the student’s work and which Department faculty member is suggested as second reader. The faculty recommenders may serve as supervisor and second reader. Students are responsible for finding Department faculty members willing to serve as supervisor and suggested second reader. The second reader is officially appointed at the discretion of the Chair.

The following timetable is recommended:

  • 15 November: Detailed Outline
  • 1 December: Progress Report
  • 15 February: First Draft
  • 30 March: Submission Deadline

The Honours Essay must be submitted to the supervisor and second reader by 30 March. A bound copy on 8 1/2" x 11" white bond paper must also be submitted to the Chair of the Department by 30 March. The copy will be retained by the Department. Normally, the essay will be between 70 and 125 double-spaced pages, although shorter essays may be acceptable depending on the type of research undertaken.
The Honours Essay will be read by both the supervisor and the second reader. The grading of the essay will be based on the following categories:

A+     excellent
A        superior
B+     very good
B        good
C+     acceptable honors
C        acceptable non-honors
D        poor
F        failure

Should the grades assigned by the supervisor and the second reader not differ by more than one category (e.g., B and B+), the higher grade will stand. When there is a discrepancy of two or more grades assigned by the supervisor and the second reader (e.g., A and B), a third reader will be appointed by the Chair. In such instances the grade for the essay will be the average of the two highest grades.

Along with the grade assigned for the essay, the supervisor and second reader will submit a brief written report that comments on the content, style, organization, and originality of the essay. The Chair reserves the right to require an oral examination on the essay. In such instances, the examining board will comprise of the supervisor, the second reader, and a third person appointed by the Chair. The final course grade will be decided by these three persons. Examiners will submit their reports to the Chair within two weeks.

Students may take AP/HIST 4000 6.0 with instructors in whose fourth-year seminar they are enrolled. In such cases, it is understood that the seminar and the Honours Essay course are separate, each with its own requirements.

AP/HIST 4053 6.0A: North American Immigration and Ethnic History

Course Director:  F. Sturino, 143 Founders College, (416)736-2100 x33251, fsturino@yorku.ca

Course Calendar Description: This course focuses on changing public attitudes, government policy, and immigrants' social, economic and political life in North America from its origins to the present. The course critically examines the historiography of North American immigration and ethnic studies, and encourages comparative analysis. Open to: History or Canadian Studies Honours majors and minors who have successfully completed at least 84 credits.

AP/HIST 4061 6.0A: Race and Politics in America Since the Second World War

Course Director:  K. Boyd, 2126 Vari Hall, (416)736-2100 x40609, kendrab@yorku.ca

Course Calendar Description: This course examines the different forms of black political action in the United States since the Second World War and assesses the effectiveness of each in reducing racial discrimination and poverty. Note: Priority is given to History or Social & Political Thought Honours majors and minors who have successfully completed at least 84 credits. Course credit exclusion: AP/HIST 4690 6.00. PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusions: AS/HIST 4061 6.00, AS/HIST 4690 6.00

Expanded Course Description: This course examines the different forms of black political action in the United States since the Second World War and assesses the effectiveness of each in reducing racial discrimination and poverty. Some topics we will explore include black economic action, the long Civil Rights Movement, black power politics, welfare activism, the prisoners’ rights movement, and black art as politics. The course will end with a discussion on race and politics in the Obama years and the Black Lives Matter movement.

Tentative Grade Breakdown/Overview of Assessment:

Participation (students must attend and contribute to discussions): 20%
Reading Responses: 15%
Essay 1: 10%
Essay 2: 15%
Final Paper Proposal: 10%
Final Paper: 30%

NOTE: Prior to buying textbooks, students should consult the detailed course outline which will give the final versions of the weekly syllabus and the detailed breakdown of assignments with weighting and due dates.  The course outline will be posted in Moodle and discussed on the first day of class.

AP/HIST 4116 6.0A: Alexander the Great: Myth and Reality

Course Director:  J. Trevett, 2180 Vari Hall, (416)736-2100 x30409, jtrevett@yorku.ca

Course Calendar Description: This course studies the life of Alexander the Great. It seeks to set his achievements within the context of Greek, Macedonian and Near Eastern history, and to disentangle the truth about him from the often unreliable and conflicting sources. Prerequisites: AP/HIST 2100 6.00 or AP/HUMA 3100 6.00 or AP/HUMA 3102 3.00 or AP/HUMA 3104 6.00 or AP/HUMA 3105 6.00 or AP/HUMA 3110 6.00 and AP/HIST 3120 6.00 or AP/HIST 3125 3.00 or AP/HIST 3130 6.00 or AP/HIST 3131 6.00 or AP/HIST 3135 3.00 or AP/HIST 3140 3.00 or AP/HIST 3150 6.00 or AP/HIST 3152 6.00 or AP/HIST 3153 6.00 or AP/HIST 3154 3.00 or AP/HIST 3160 6.00 or departmental permission. Open to: Priority is given to History, Classical Studies or Hellenic Studies Honours majors and minors who have successfully completed at least 84 credits.

AP/HIST 4230 6.0A: Technologies of Communication: A History of Reading from the Codex to the Kindle

(Crosslisted to: AP/EN 4480 6.00)

Course Director:  M. Schotte, 2138 Vari Hall, (416)736-2100 x30418, mschotte@yorku.ca

“The Book Wheel” A. Ramelli, Le diverse et artificiose machine del Capitano Agostino Ramelli (1588) Image credit: http://smithsonianlibraries.tumblr.com/

“The Book Wheel”
A. Ramelli, Le diverse et artificiose machine
del Capitano Agostino Ramelli (1588)
Image credit: http://smithsonianlibraries.tumblr.com/

 

Course Calendar Description: This research seminar explores the history of books and their readers from antiquity to the present. Class is held in York's Clara Thomas Archives & Special Collections, and includes trips to other area libraries. By studying books as material objects and communication technologies, we will investigate questions of intellectual property, literacy, author and audience, and "the future of the book." Prerequisites: None. Co-requisites: None. Course credit exclusions: AP/WRIT4720 6.0; prior to 2009, AP/HIST 4260 6.00 (FW14 & FW15 only). Priority is given to History Honours majors and minors who have successfully completed at least 84 credits.

 

 

 

AP/HIST 4360 6.0A: Europe Between the Wars, 1918-1939

Course Director:  TBA

Course Calendar Description: Problems such as political ideologies, militarism, economic instability, youth movements and class roles in modernization, studied comparatively across frontiers wherever possible. Course credit exclusion: AP/HIST 4030 6.00.

 

AP/HIST 4470 6.0A: War, Sex and Drink: Modern Britain in the Archives

Course Director:  S. Brooke, 2188 Vari Hall, (416)736-2100 x66980, sjbrooke@yorku.ca

Course Calendar Description:  This course uses digital archives to analyze the historical experience of Britain from the 1880s to the 1980s. Topics covered include popular culture in late Victorian London, urban poverty, the First World War, working-class culture between the wars, sexual attitudes in the 1940s, the Second World War, the British empire, youth and popular culture in the 1960s, women’s liberation and the Thatcher years.

Prerequisites: Students need 84 credits to apply and must have fulfilled a 1000-level
requirement. Priority is given to History Honours majors and minors who have successfully completed at least 84 credits and fulfilled a 1000-level requirement.

 

AP/HIST 4511 6.0A: Themes in Canadian Social and Cultural History

Course Director:  TBA

Course Calendar Description: This course focuses upon such themes as social change, the formation of new social and economic groups, and the development of social institutions and patterns of thought. Note: Priority is given to History or Canadian Studies Honours majors and minors who have successfully completed at least 84 credits.

AP/HIST 4520 6.0A: Metis History in North America: From the Ethnogenesis of a New People in the 17th-Century Fur Trade to their Fight for Rights in the 21st Century

Course Director:  C. Podruchny, 718 Kaneff Tower, carolynp@yorku.ca

DOWNLOAD DRAFT SYLLABUS

Course Calendar Description: This course studies the history of Métis in North America from the meeting of Indigenous women and European fur traders in 1630 to court cases of Métis rights in the 21st century. It examines the emergence of distinct ethnic groups that blended European and indigenous traditions, and the transformation of Métis into a political collectivity recognized in the Canadian constitution. Open to: History and Multicultural and Indigenous Studies Majors and Minors Note: Priority is given to History and Multicultural and Indigenous Studies Honours majors and minors who have successfully completed at least 84 credits.

Expanded Course Description:
Metis people are a distinct ethnic group that emerged among descendants of First Nations women and European men during the fur trade in North America. Canada’s Constitution recognizes Métis as one of Canada’s three Aboriginal groups and currently approximately 400,000 self-identify as Metis. Although the United States does not recognize Metis as a distinct ethnic group, tens of thousands of self-identified Metis live in the northwestern states. This course explores the meeting of Indigenous women and European men in the fur trade starting in the 17th century through to the 19th century, how their children established distinct communities, the emergence of a distinct Metis language (Michif), various economies of Metis communities, as well as cultural practices, religion, clothing and material culture. It will trace the development of a distinct political collectivity in the western part of North America, focusing on political battles in the Red River settlement, and on the resistances of 1869-70 and 1885. It will then turn to the decline and erasure of Metis communities, the losses incurred in the process of allocating scrip, and the destitution of road allowance communities. The course will end with the resurgence of Metis political organizations in the 1970s and 1980s, the fight for political recognition from the Canadian and U.S. governments, and the renaissance in Metis art, music, and community pride. The course introduced students to a wide range of primary sources.

Tentative Grade Breakdown/Overview of Assessment:

Assignment Percentage of Total Grade Due Date
Article or Website Review 10% October 10, 2019
Primary Source Assessment 10% November 21, 2019
Research Essay Total 40%
a) Topic and Bibliography 5% January 9, 2019
b) Annotated Bibliography and Outline 10% February 6, 2020
c) Final Draft 25% March 19, 2020
Participation in Discussion 30% Every Class
Chairing a Class 5% TBA
Presentation of Research Essay 5% April 2, 2020

Special Features:

The course will include a variety of guest speakers and workshops, and will include a wide range of primary sources.

Required textbook: Gerhard J. Ens and Joe Sawchuk, From New Peoples to New Nations: Aspects of Métis History and Identity from the Eighteenth to the Twenty-First Centuries (University of Toronto Press 2016).

NOTE: Prior to buying textbooks, students should consult the detailed course outline which will give the final versions of the weekly syllabus and the detailed breakdown of assignments with weighting and due dates.  The course outline will be posted in Moodle and discussed on the first day of class.

AP/HIST 4565 6.0A: Cultural Revolution: The 1960s in Canada

Course Director: M. Martel, 2166 Vari Hall, (416)736-2100 x30429, mmartel@yorku.ca

Course Calendar Description: The 1960s have influenced the collective memory of Canadians. Although this course focuses on Canadian society, the international context is taken into account. This course is intended to provide students with an opportunity to study an era in Canadian history -- the decade of the 1960s-- by analyzing its cultural, economic, ideological, political, and social aspects. It pays attention to several phenomena that were instrumental in shaping the 1960s: the cultural revolution, the Hippies, University protest, the feminist movement, the protest movements in Europe and in the United States and their impact on Canada, the transformation of the political culture, the development of the Welfare State, and the rise of the independence movement in Quebec. Priority is given to History Honours majors and minors who have successfully completed at least 84 credits. Prerequisite: Students must have successfully completed 84 credits. Course credit exclusions: AP/HIST 4052 6.00

Expanded Course Description: The course involves lectures and classroom discussions. The assigned readings include primary sources, book chapters, journal articles and short videos.

List of topics:
Baby Boomers; Counterculture; Drug Use; Hippies; Indigenous people; Student activism; the Sexual Revolution; Women’s movement; State Surveillance; the impact of the Quiet Revolution; Bilingualism and Multiculturalism; the war in Viet Nam.

Tentative Grade Breakdown/Overview of Assessment:

There are three assignments
-Oral history (interviews): 15%
-Analysis of a primary document: 25%
-Proposal for a Heritage Moment on the Sixties: 35%
-Participation: 25%

NOTE: Prior to buying textbooks, students should consult the detailed course outline which will give the final versions of the weekly syllabus and the detailed breakdown of assignments with weighting and due dates.  The course outline will be posted in Moodle and discussed on the first day of class.

AP/HIST 4755 6.0A: Cultural and Social History of Colonial Latin America

Course Director:  A. Durston, 827 Kaneff Tower , (416)736-2100 x66962, durston@yorku.ca

Course Calendar Description: Comparative analysis of the cultures and societies of Colonial Latin America; discussion of the historical process of reinventing, reinterpreting and negotiating the colonial reality. Note: Priority is given to History Honours majors and minors who have successfully completed at least 84 credits. Prior TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusion: AS/HIST 4755 6.00.

Expanded Course Description:  This seminar will examine indigenous society and culture in Mexico and Peru—the focal areas of the Spanish colonial empire and previously of the largest indigenous states of the Americas—during the 16th and 17th centuries. We will seek answers to one of the most fundamental questions about colonial Latin America: how were indigenous societies able to rebuild and even flourish after the Spanish conquests? To tackle this question we will focus on native leaders and their struggles to meet the demands of colonial rule while maintaining the distinctiveness and cohesiveness of their societies. We will study native leaders in their roles as mediators between Spanish and indigenous society, and as creators of new narratives, texts, and beliefs that sought to position indigenous peoples more advantageously in the colonial context.

Tentative Grade Breakdown/Overview of Assessment:

Participation: 20%
Fall Essay: 15%
Fall Paper: 20%
Quiz: 5%
Oral Presentation: 10%
Winter Paper: 30%

There will be an optional “research track” with a different breakdown for students wishing to write research papers.

NOTE: Prior to buying textbooks, students should consult the detailed course outline which will give the final versions of the weekly syllabus and the detailed breakdown of assignments with weighting and due dates.  The course outline will be posted in Moodle and discussed on the first day of class.

AP/HIST 4765 6.0A: Rethinking Gender in East Asian History

Course Director:  J. Kim, 706 Kaneff Tower , (416)736-2100 x30402, jkim@yorku.ca

Course Calendar Description: Examines gender roles in pre-modern and modern China, Korea and Japan. It focuses on women: their places in the family and society, their relationships with one another and men, and the evolution of ideas about gender. Note: Priority is given to History or East Asian Studies Honours majors and minors who have successfully completed at least 84 credits.

 

AP/HIST 4770 6.0A: The African Urban Past: From the Pre-colonial Era to the Present

Course Director:  J. Curto, 315 York Lanes , (416)736-2100 x66965, jccurto@yorku.ca

Course Calendar Description: This course examines Africa's urban past. It first concentrates on precolonial cities as centres of political organization, religious learning, regional and long-distance trade and, thereafter, on urban health, crime, women, crowds, squatters, workers and political movements during the colonial and post-independence eras. Prerequisites: AP/HIST 2750 6.00 or AP/HIST 3780 6.00 or AP/SOSC 2480 9.00 or AP/HIST 3480 6.00 or departmental permission. Course credit exclusions: None. Open to: This course is restricted to History and African Studies Honours majors and minors who have successfully completed at least 84 credits. PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusion: AS/HIST 4770 6.00.

AP/HIST 4800 6.0A: The Science of Society: Social Thought in North America, 1890-1940

(Crosslisted to: AP/HUMA 4220 6.00)

Course Director:  M. Shore, 2184 Vari Hall, (416)736-2100 x66975, mshore@yorku.ca

Course Calendar Description: This course presents an analysis of the intellectual, cultural and social changes which contributed to the rise of the social sciences and re-organization of the liberal arts in North America during the period 1890-1940. By focusing on this context as well as major theories and trends in several disciplines, this course will provide insight into modern North American culture. Priority is given to History, Humanities and Social & Political Thought Honours majors and minors who have successfully completed at least 84 credits.

Expanded Course Description:

  1. a) The period 1890 to 1940 saw a major shift in social and cultural thought in North America because of war, economic development, industrial and technological change, urbanization, immigration, scientific and medical developments. A wide array of individuals and institutions in psychology, criminology, anthropology, social work, sociology, economics, political science, home economics, literature, history, religion, law, consumerism, advertising, and popular culture wrestled with the impact of these changes and tried to devise new ideas about identity, community, society, and concepts of "nation" and commemoration. This course focuses on these developments as a means to understand Canadian and American culture and society in the late nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Readings and discussions examine the currents of thought in each of these areas, and in related movements for social reform. Students will deal with a wide variety of texts, including novels, and analyses of culture and popular culture. A highlight of the course is the second term class mini-conference consisting of poster presentations from all of the seminar participants.

Topics to be treated over the 24-week period include:

Social  and Economic Change at the Turn of the Century; The Chicago World’s Fair, 1893, and American Society; The Birth of Modern Culture; Social Disorder; Darwinism and Spiritualism; Christianity and Social Reform; The Rise of Domestic Science (Home Economics); Women, Work, and Consumerism; American Ideas of Empire; Moral Reform and the Family; Self-Culture and Self-Help; Commercial Culture and Marketing; Nature versus Nurture debates; Representations of Difference; Scientific Management and Efficiency; Food Consumption and Social Structures; Nation, Memory, and  Commemoration.

  1. b) Titles of some of the readings that will figure prominently in the course:

Manliness and Civilization; The Alienist: A Novel; Reluctant Modernism; Cheaper By the Dozen; The Mismeasure of Man; The Big Oyster: History on the Half Shell;  The Devil in the White City:  Murder, Magic, and Madness at the Fair That Changed America; The Making of Middlebrow Culture; All the World's a Fair: Visions of Empire at American International Expositions, 1876-1916; Perfection Salad: Women and Cooking at the Turn of the Century; Ladies of Labor; Girls of Adventure.

  1. c) A prime learning objective of this course is to provide students with an understanding of the developments that gave shape to current social and political issues, debates, and controversies.

A prime learning activity is the poster presentation, a period of three or four seminars in which students will engage in a conference-like setting. In these sessions, students will have the opportunity to present their research findings as exhibits (consisting of visual and written material) and discuss these with their colleagues. This activity provides practice in such professional skills as public speaking, lecturing, and engaging in question-and-answer periods.

Special Features:  The poster presentation seminars mentioned above:  a few seminar sessions are set aside for poster presentations where students present their work on their research essays in a mini-conference format with the class and professor acting as audience participants.

Tentative Grade Breakdown/Overview of Assessment:

1 analytical review essay (1st term): 20%
1 major research essay (2nd term), consisting of poster presentation (10%) and final written paper (30%)
Seminar leadership (1 per term):  10% x 2 = 20%
Weekly seminar attendance, participation, and contribution (both terms):  20%

NOTE: Prior to buying textbooks, students should consult the detailed course outline which will give the final versions of the weekly syllabus and the detailed breakdown of assignments with weighting and due dates.  The course outline will be discussed on the first day of class.

AP/HIST 4840 6.0A: Public History

Course Director: J. Bonnell, 2130 Vari Hall, 416-736-2100 x30422, bonnellj@yorku.ca

Course Calendar Description: This course examines the forms, goals, and practices of making history in museums, archives, historic sites, and other institutions of public history. It enables students to learn the meaning and methods in the production of memory and introduces them to the practical skills for the public presentation of historical knowledge. The course combines analytical study with a part-time placement in a public-history site. Course credit exclusion: GL/HIST 4310 6.0 Note: Priority is given to History Honours Majors and Minors who have successfully completed at least 84 credits.

Expanded Course Description:  Public history investigates the ways that history is understood by and interpreted for the public. This course examines the history, theory, and practice of public history in a wide variety of venues, including museums, archives, historic sites, the internet, and film. Key topics will include collective memory and nation-building, questions of race, gender, and ethnicity in the representation of public history, commemorating war, and the presentation of “difficult” histories in museums and other venues.

In addition to class readings and discussions, focused workshops throughout the course will introduce students to the practical skills for the public presentation of historical knowledge, including oral history interview techniques, communication and presentation skills, and digital tools for public history. Students will meet practitioners in the field and visit several public history-related sites.

At the end of this course, students will be able to identify key debates within the scholarly literature on public history and describe how these debates have changed over time. Through course assignments and the term 2 placement experience, student will also gain concrete skills in the following areas:

  • Collaborating and communicating in a professional manner with institutions and/or community organizations
  • Conducting independent research on a specific topic using primary sources in archives, libraries, and heritage sites
  • Devising a public history project by exploring and synthesizing a wide range of sources, crafting a narrative about the past, and presenting it in an accessible and creative manner (podcast, journalistic news article, walking tour, short film, etc.)

Course Readings: TBA. Most, if not all, of the course readings will be available freely to student through the course Moodle site.

Special Features:  This course has a significant workplace-integrated experiential education component. In term 2, students will be assigned to museum or archive within the Greater Toronto Area to complete a 12-week placement (ten hours/week) resulting in the completion of a public history “product” (for example, a podcast, walking tour, exhibition, or online content).

This course is required for completion of the History department’s new cross-disciplinary undergraduate Certificate in Public History: https://history.laps.yorku.ca/public-history-certificate/

Tentative Grade Breakdown/Overview of Assessment:

Participation: 20%
Letter of Introduction (19 September): 5%
Podcast Proposal (3 October): 5%
Final Podcast (21 November): 15%
Research Project Proposal and Workplan (23 January): 5%
Research Paper: (19 March): 20%
Final Project Presentation (3 April): 10%
Final Public History Project: (5 April): 20%

AP/HIST 4990 3.0A (F), AP/HIST 4990 3.0M (W), AP/HIST 4990 6.0A: Supervised Reading and Research

This course is normally open only to majors of exceptional ability (defined as a B+ or higher average in History) with the permission of the Chair or Director of Undergraduate Studies. Students may take no more than six credits under this course rubric.

To apply for permission to do History 4990, students must submit a formal application to the Director of Undergraduate Studies, normally at the beginning of Term. Application forms (available in Vari Hall 2140) require: a brief course description and rationale; a proposed evaluation breakdown (at least 60% of the final grade must be based on written work); a list of relevant History courses completed and in-progress; a representative bibliography (with a minimum of 20 titles listed in standard academic format); and the name and signature of the supervisor (who must normally be full-time faculty in the Department of History). Students are responsible for finding Department members willing to serve as supervisor.

The Chair or Director of Undergraduate Studies must be satisfied that the subject of History 4990 is demonstrably distinct and separate from that of any other course taken by the student. History 4990 may be supervised by the instructor in another of the student’s courses.

The detailed programme of study will be determined by the student and the supervisor. Students are expected to prepare a substantial amount of written work. The student’s final grade will be based primarily (at least 60%) on the assessment of the written work by the course.

Normally, in any one year, no instructor may supervise more than a total of three courses under the rubrics of AP/HIST 4000 6.0 (Honours Essay), AP/HIST 4990 6.0 (Supervised Reading and Research), or AP/HIST 3990 6.0 (Supervised Reading and Research).

  • Students may take directed reading courses only after having successfully completed (passed)
  • 24 credits in the Faculty of Liberal Arts & Professional Studies.
  • The maximum permissible number of directed reading courses depends on a student’s program type. Students in Honours BA programs may take 24 such credits; students in a BA program may take 18 such credits.
  • Within their last 30 credits, students may take a maximum of 12 credits in directed reading courses.
  • Students may take a maximum of 12 credits of directed reading courses with the same faculty member.

AP/HIST 4991 3.0A (F), AP/HIST 4991 3.0M (W), AP/HIST 4991 6.0A - Advanced Seminar in History

Fourth-year students who have an average in their major of B+ or better may be allowed to register in some 5000-level courses in the Graduate Programme in History. As with 4000-level courses, admission is at the course director’s discretion. Undergraduates in such courses will have the same workload as their graduate classmates.

The History Department will record the enrolment as AP/HIST4991 6.0/3.0, Advanced Seminar in History, on the student’s transcript, and it will count as a 4000-level seminar. On request, the department will attest, on letterhead, that History 4991 is a graduate-level course. For further information and permission to enrol, see the Director of Undergraduate Studies.