3000 Level Courses

AP/HIST 3135 3.0M (WINTER): Spectacle and Society in Ancient Rome

Course Director:  J. Edmondson, 2178 Vari Hall, (416)736-2100 x30417, jedmond@yorku.ca

This course traces the development of gladiatorial presentations, chariot-races and other public spectacles in Rome, Italy and the Roman Empire from 200 BC to 400 AD. It concentrates in particular on their changing nature, scale and socio-cultural function. Course credit exclusions: None. Prior TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusion: AS/HIST 3135 3.00.

AP/HIST 3150 6.0A: Early Greek History from the Bronze Age to the Persian Wars

Course Director:  TBA

This course examines the political, social, economic and intellectual history of Greece in the Bronze Age and the Archaic Period. It covers Mycenean Greece, the Dark Age, the rise of the city-state and culminates in the Persian Wars.

Course credit exclusions: None. Prior TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusion: AS/HIST 3150 6.00.

AP/HIST 3154 3.0 A (FALL): Egypt from Alexander to Cleopatra

Course Director:  B. Kelly, 2190 Vari Hall, (416)736-2100 x30415, benkelly@yorku.ca

Course Calendar Description: Examines the social and cultural history of Ptolemaic Egypt from the Macedonian occupation in 332 BC to the death of Cleopatra VII in 30 BC.
Course credit exclusions: None.

Expanded Course Description:

The occupation of Egypt by Alexander the Great and the establishment of the Ptolemaic monarchy resulted in a significant influx of settlers from all around the Greek world. In this course, we examine the complex social, cultural, and political negotiations that resulted from this ancient episode of colonialism. How did the Ptolemaic monarchs, who had established their dynasty by force, attempt to obtain political legitimacy in the eyes of both Greeks and Egyptians? Were relations between Greeks and Egyptians characterised mainly by fruitful interaction, or by hostility and suspicion? Was there a synthesis of Egyptian and Hellenic culture, or did the two remain radically separate? In this course, we seek to explore these questions, especially by exploiting the abundant papyrological evidence from the Ptolemaic period.

Tentative Grade Breakdown/Overview of assessment:

Tutorial Attendance and Participation: 10%
In-class essay: 20%
Major Essay: 35%
Final Examination: 5%

NOTE: Prior to buying textbooks, students should consult the detailed course outline which will give the final versions of the weekly syllabus and the detailed breakdown of assignments with weighting and due dates.  The course outline will be posted in Moodle and discussed on the first day of class.

More information:  http://history.laps.yorku.ca/

AP/HIST 3155 3.0M (WINTER): Egypt from Cleopatra: Society and Culture in a Roman Province

Course Director:  B. Kelly, 2190 Vari Hall, (416)736-2100 x30415, benkelly@yorku.ca

Course Calendar Description: This course examines the social and cultural history of Egypt from the Roman conquest and death of the last Ptolemaic monarch, Cleopatra, in 30 BC to the end of Roman rule in the seventh century AD.

Course credit exclusions: AP/HIST 4140 6.00 (2007-2008, 2008-2009, 2009-2010).

Expanded Course Description:

When Egypt came under Roman rule in 30 BC, its administrative machinery certainly changed. But what of the social and cultural impacts of these transitions? Did the inhabitants of Egypt begin to identify as Romans? Did political and administrative change really impinge on the deeper structures and processes of life on the Nile, such as the relationship of people to their gods, the interactions between men and women, and the cycle of births and deaths? In this course we explore these issues, making particular use of the rich papyrological evidence from the period.

Tentative Grade Breakdown/Overview of Assessment:

Tutorial Attendance and Participation: 10%
Artefact Assignment: 25%
Essay: 30%
Final Examination: 35%

NOTE: Prior to buying textbooks, students should consult the detailed course outline which will give the final versions of the weekly syllabus and the detailed breakdown of assignments with weighting and due dates.  The course outline will be posted in Moodle and discussed on the first day of class.

More information:  http://history.laps.yorku.ca/

AP/HIST 3180 6.0A: The Rise and Fall of Sassanian Empire, 224-642

Course Director: T. Abdullah, 2158 Vari Hall, (416)736-2100 x30412, athabit@yorku.ca

The course will cover the origins of the Sassanians of Iran, their rise and domination of the Middle East, and their subsequent defeat and fall at the hands of the Arab Muslims.

Course credit exclusions: None. Prior TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusion: AS/HIST 3180 6.00.

AP/HIST 3234 3.0A (FALL): Women and Gender in Early Modern Europe

Course Director:  M. Schotte, 2138 Vari Hall, (416)736-2100 x30418, mschotte@yorku.ca

Calendar Description: This course explores gender ideologies and their lived social and cultural meanings for women – and men – during modern Europe's foundational centuries, 1500-1800. Examines intersections between evolving cultural norms, familial roles, and women's varied activities in spaces outside the domestic household. Also considers gender in relation to major developments of the era – statebuilding, capitalism, overseas expansion, religion and the literacy revolution. Prerequisites: None. Course credit exclusions: AP/HIST 3233 6.00.

Expanded Course Description:  This course places a strong emphasis on engaging with primary sources, particularly those created by and for women. We will not only analyze their content but also read them aloud and examine them as physical objects in order to better understand their authors and audiences. This class will be run seminar-style, and strongly prioritizes engaged participation. The course includes a field trip to a local museum (with a related assignment on material objects as historical sources).

Tentative Grade Breakdown/Overview of Assessment:
Participation: 25%
Poetry recitation: 5%
Material culture analysis (3 pages): 20%
Primary source analysis (5 pages): 25%
Final exam: 25%

NOTE: Prior to buying textbooks, students should consult the detailed course outline which will give the final versions of the weekly syllabus and the detailed breakdown of assignments with weighting and due dates.  The course outline will be posted in Moodle and discussed on the first day of class.

More information:  http://history.laps.yorku.ca/

AP/HIST 3270 3.0M (WINTER): Pirates: From Past to Present

(cross-listed with AP/HUMA 3018)

Course Director:  W. Gleberzon, 041 McLaughlin, (416)736-2100 x77328, wgleber@yorku.ca

This course will begin with an exploration of the theory and practice of piracy.  It will analyze the mythology of piracy, and consider this mythology in the context of historical and social realities of piracy. The course will examine what drove men and women to engage in piracy, how piracy is defined and its various forms (e.g. privateers vs. pirates).  The course will also explore the politics of piracy, such as the impact on the government policy of various European nations (e.g., England, France, Holland), the United States of America, the Muslim nations of North Africa during the sixteenth, seventeenth and eighteenth century as specifically related to piracy, as well as the internal politics of 'pirate' groups (e.g., democratic, anarchic, etc.). The course will explore the subject of piracy in its historical aspect, as well as in its literary, musical, and cinematic representations.  The course will cover a wide range of historical instances of piracy from its earliest recorded instances, e.g., Julius Caesar's encounter with pirates as a youth, and the Vikings.  The course also covers a wide geographical range including the pirates of the Adriatic and Mediterranean Sea, pirates of China and India, piracy in the Atlantic and Caribbean world, and the current issues associated with pirates in Somalia.

Prerequisites: None. Course credit exclusions: None.
Cross-listed to: AP/HUMA 3018 3.00.

AP/HIST 3355 6.0A: Greeks in the World. A History of Greek Migration and Diaspora in the 20th Century

Course Director:  A. Gekas,  2120 Vari Hall, (416)736-2100 x30423, agekas@yorku.ca

This course explores the history of Greece from its struggle for independence from the Ottoman Empire (achieved in 1821) to the present with a focus on social, cultural and political developments.

Course credit exclusions: None. Prior TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusion: AS/HIST 3355 6.00.

AP/HIST 3381 3.0M (WINTER): Eastern Europe, Since 1918

Course Director:  K. Weiser, 754 Kaneff Tower, (416)736-2100 x33561, kweiser@yorku.ca

Course Calendar Description: The "Successor States"; their interwar problems and successes; evolution during the Second World War; four decades of Communist rule; return to diversity in the 1990's. Course credit exclusions: GL/HIST 3275 6.00. Prior TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusions:AS/HIST 3381 3.00, GL/HIST 3275 6.00.

Expanded Course Description:  The course begins with the impact of WWI and the emergence of republics in Eastern Europe from the wreckage of empires. It follows the internal and external challenges to countries such as Poland, Czechoslovakia, Hungary, Yugoslavia, and the Baltic States as they struggled to consolidate as chiefly national states in a decidedly multi-national region. It then turns its attention to Hitler and Stalin’s reorganization of the region during WWII, genocide and ethnic cleansing, and the subsequent Sovietization of those countries liberated by the Red Army. The last part of the course addresses the socialist regimes of Eastern Europe during the Cold War, the end of Soviet hegemony and the wave of democratic revolutions in 1989, ethnic conflict in the former Yugoslavia, memory of the Holocaust and WWII, and attempts by newly-sovereign states to join united Germany in a project for European integration.

Readings include selections from:

Joseph Rotschild, East Central Europe between the Wars
Gale Stokes, From Stalinism to Pluralism
Timothy Snyder, Bloodlands
Jan Gross, Neighbors
Timothy Garton Ash, The Magic Lantern: The Revolution of ’89 Witnessed in Warsaw, Budapest, Berlin, and Prague

Students will become familiar with the ethnic, cultural, and religious diversity of Eastern Europe. Students will become acquainted with a variety of political ideas, among them nationalism, federalism, fascism, communism, populism, and democracy.

AP/HIST 3420 6.0A: The British Empire from 1600 to the Present

Course Director:  C. McMahon, cmcmahon@yorku.ca

This course surveys the history of the British Empire from 1600 to the present, from the founding of the East India Company, to dominant world power, to decolonization and independence, to imperial nostalgia. Course credit exclusions: None. Prior TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusion: AK/HIST 3680 6.00.

AP/HIST 3531 6.0A: The Working Class in Canadian Society

(cross-listed with AP/SOSC 3210)

Course Director: R. Targa, rtarga@yorku.ca

This course explores the changing nature of paid and unpaid work in Canada in the 19th and 20th centuries and the impact of those changes on Canadian society.

Course credit exclusion: AP/HIST 3250 6.00. PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusions: AK/HIST 3250 6.00, AS/SOSC 3210 6.00.

AP/HIST 3546 6.0A: History of Aboriginal Peoples in Canada

Course Director:  V. Freeman, vfreeman@yorku.ca

Examines the history of Aboriginal peoples within the area known today as Canada, from "time immemorial" to the postwar period. Topics may include origin stories; oral traditions; interactions with colonial empires; participation in the fur trade; epidemic diseases and health strategies; indigenous spirituality and Christian missionaries; treaties; the Indian Act; residential schooling; reserve life; political resistance; and land claims. Course credit exclusions: None.

AP/HIST 3580 6.0A: 20th Century Canada

Course Director:  M. Martel, 2166 Vari Hall (416)736-2100 x30429, mmartel@yorku.ca

An analysis of the major events and developments affecting Canadian society during the past hundred years, including political and constitutional evolution, economic and social change and alterations in the climate of ideas.

Course credit exclusions: None. Prior TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusion: AS/HIST 3580 6.00.

AP/HIST 3622 3.0A (FALL): The U.S. Civil War in American History and Public Memory

Course Director:  B. Cothran, 2132 Vari Hall (416)736-2100 x66959, cothran@yorku.ca

This course, which focuses on the years from 1840 to 1877, explores the causes of the U.S. Civil War, military strategy, and the aftermath of this conflict. Topics examined include slavery, politics, military history and the era of Reconstruction. Course credit exclusion: AP/HIST 3602 6.00. Prior TO FALL 2014: AP/HIST 3622 3.00. Prior TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusion: AS/HIST 3622 3.00

AP/HIST 3700 6.0A: Atlantic Encounters: Brazil, the Caribbean and Western Africa before 1900

Course Director:  P. Lovejoy, 329 York Lanes (416)736-2100 x66917, plovejoy@yorku.ca

Relations between Brazil, the Caribbean and Western Africa are studied from c. 1500 to the late 19th century, with an emphasis on the nature of the European Empires in Western Africa, Brazil, and the Caribbean, the impact of colonial rule and neo-colonialism, and the varied responses of indigenous societies to both developments. Prerequisite: None. Co-requisite: None. Course credit exclusions: None.

AP/HIST 3710 3.0A (FALL): Reconstructing Society in the Post Slavery Caribbean

Course Director: D. Trotman, 326 Founders College, (416)736-2100 x33192, dtrotman@yorku.ca

Special Features: This course is recommended for students majoring in Latin American and Caribbean Studies.

Course Calendar Description: This course examines the patterns of continuity and change in the institutions of post slavery Caribbean societies. The emphasis is on the processes of social re-engineering and cultural creation in the aftermath of nineteenth century slave emancipation and twentieth century revolution.
Prior TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusion: AS/HIST 3710 6.00; HIST 2730 6.00

Expanded course description:

The course begins with an examination of emancipation as event and process before a focus on developments in Haiti as the first large-scale emancipation in the region. Then, with pan- Caribbean examples, the course explores the different strategies used by the emancipated to change the circumstances of their socio-cultural conditions in the face of the tendency to the continuity of the economic and political institutions inherited from the era of slavery.

ALL of the required and recommended readings for this course will be available ONLINE and posted on Moodle and on Reserve at YUL.

The intended learning outcome of this course is to contribute to the intellectual development of students by developing a capacity for their ability to read ,comprehend, and discuss scholarly articles to communicate their understanding of the content of scholarly articles in cogent prose to understand and critically evaluate both public and scholarly debates surrounding historical events to participate through blogs in online debates in a scholarly manner.

Tentative Grade Breakdown/Overview of Assessment:

Mid term Essay and Final Exam: 60%
On line interventions (blogs and reading responses): 30%
In class participation: 10%

NOTE: Students should consult the detailed course outline which will give the final versions of the weekly syllabus and the detailed breakdown of assignments with weighting and due dates.  The course outline will be posted in Moodle and discussed on the first day of class.

More information:  http://history.laps.yorku.ca/

AP/HIST 3736 6.0A: Indigenous Struggles in Latin America

Course Director: A. Durston, 827 Kaneff Tower, durston@yorku.ca

Course Calendar Description: Introduces students to the history of the indigenous peoples of Latin America from the Iberian conquests in the sixteenth century to recent times. Course credit exclusions: None.

Expanded Course Description:

This course aims to help students understand the long-term transformations, strength, and vitality of indigenous societies in post-conquest Latin America. Geographically, we will focus on the Andean highlands of what is now Peru and Bolivia (the former heartlands of the Inca empire) and on the Maya region (especially Guatemala). These are two culturally distinct regions that nonetheless show many parallels in their post-conquest history.

We will explore the indigenous history of these regions through a series of case studies, including a novel and films as well as scholarly books. Assignments will focus on these case studies, but there will also be room for students to pursue their own interests.

A full syllabus will be made available closer to the beginning of the course, but students wanting further information should feel free to contact the instructor via email (durston@yorku.ca).

Tentative Grade Breakdown/Overview of Assessment:

Major Papers: 60%
Smaller assignments (essays or quizzes): 20%
Participation: 20%

NOTE: Prior to buying textbooks, students should consult the detailed course outline which will give the final versions of the weekly syllabus and the detailed breakdown of assignments with weighting and due dates.  The course outline will be posted in Moodle and discussed on the first day of class.

More information:  http://history.laps.yorku.ca/

AP/HIST 3760 6.0A: Modern Japan

Course Director: J. Fogel, N817 Ross Building, fogel@yorku.ca

Course Calendar Description: Japan from her unification as a nation in 1600, through the era of seclusion to 1868, and the drive for empire that ended in 1945, to recovery from defeat and evolution as a leading world economic power today.

Course credit exclusions: None. Prior TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusion: AS/HIST 3760 6.00.

Expanded Course Description:

This course begins with the lengthy civil wars leading to the unification of Japan in 1600 under the Tokugawa regime.  It covers intellectual, social, economic, and cultural history.  The West arrives in the middle of the 19th century and forces Japan to open her doors to trade and diplomacy.  Japan takes the bait, works overtime to become a modern nation-state, invades its neighbors in an effort to create its own empire, and eventually is crushed in WWII.  In its aftermath Japan slowly emerges as an economic powerhouse in both East Asian and the world.

Tentative Grade Breakdown/Overview of Assessment:

Midterm, final (each term) and a short paper.

NOTE: Prior to buying textbooks, students should consult the detailed course outline which will give the final versions of the weekly syllabus and the detailed breakdown of assignments with weighting and due dates.  The course outline will be posted in Moodle and discussed on the first day of class.

More information:  http://history.laps.yorku.ca/

AP/HIST 3773 3.0A (FALL): Opium, Rebellion, and the Woman Question in China 1800-1911

Course Director:  J. Judge, 2122 Vari Hall (416)736-2100 x20593, judge@yorku.ca

Special Features: Contributes to fulfillment of requirements for the various East Asian Studies Program degrees

Course Calendar Description: This course engages the first seventy years of "China's 100 years of humiliation" (1842-1949). We examine China's often violent encounters with foreign powers beginning with the Opium Wars in the mid-19th century. Our focus is on China's efforts from 1800-1911 to become a modern nation through the reform of politics, society and the status of women, and ultimately through rebellion.

Expanded Course Description:

This course engages a crucial period in modern Chinese history, the first seventy years of what has become known in Chinese communist historiography as “China’s 100 years of humiliation” (1842-1949). We examine China’s often violent encounters with foreign powers beginning with the Opium Wars in the mid-19th century, encounters that fundamentally transformed China’s position in the world order and its sense of cultural self-sufficiency. We also study the equally devastating domestic rebellions—the Taiping and Boxer Rebellions—that further weakened the imperial state. We simultaneously explore China’s efforts to reassert itself and become a modern nation through the introduction of new technologies; political, administrative, and gender reform; and ultimately, revolution.

Our focus is not only on diplomatic and political developments but on the social, cultural, and intellectual changes that underpinned them. These include the culture and economics of opium consumption, the lived experience of the Taiping Rebellion, and the rise of the woman question as China’s last dynasty began to falter.

The core textbooks for the course are:
Spence, Jonathan D. The Search for Modern China, W. W. Norton & Company, 3rd Revised edition, 2012.
Chen, Janet, Pei-kai Cheng, Michael Lestz with Jonathan Spence. The Search for Modern China: A Documentary Collection, W. W. Norton & Company, 3rd Edition, 2013.

We will also read:
Meyer-Fong, Tobie. What Remains: Coming to Terms with Civil War in 19th Century China. Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2013.
Together with the following articles or chapters:
Brook, Timothy and Bob Tadashi Wakabayashi, Opium Regimes : China, Britain, and Japan, 1839-1952, Berkeley : University of California Press, 2000 (selected chapters).
Cohen, Paul A. “The Contested Past: The Boxers as History and Myth.” The Journal of Asian Studies 51:1 (Feb., 1992), pp. 82-113
Elman, Benjamin. “Naval Warfare and the Refraction of China’s Self-Strengthening Reforms into
Scientific and Technological Failure, 1865–1895.” Modern Asian Studies 38:2 (2004), 283-326.
Qian, Nanxiu. Politics, Poetics, and Gender in Late Qing China: Xue Shaohui (1866-1911) and the Era of Reform. Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2015 (selected chapters).
Rankin, Mary, “The Emergence of Women at the end of the Ch’ing: The Case of Ch’iu Chin.” In Margery Wolf and Roxanne Witke, eds..  Women in Chinese Society, pp. 39-66.   Stanford:  Stanford University Press, 1976.

This course will contribute to the program learning outcomes for a BA Major in History, an Honors BA Major, and a Specialized Honors BA Major in History by:

-providing students with factual knowledge of modern Chinese history; it covers the crucial seven decades leading up to the 1911 Revolution which put an end to 2000 years of imperial rule; a second course, Hist. 3772 will cover the period from the 1911 to the 1949 revolutions

-helping students understand processes of historical change over time

-explaining a number of the key historical developments in Chinese history and East Asian history

-raising awareness of the diversity of human experience in the Chinese historical context

Tentative Grade Breakdown/Overview of Assessment:

Class participation (engagement in class discussions, raising discussion questions at assigned intervals): 20%
Group Presentation: 10%
Paper: 30%
Final exam: 40%

NOTE: Prior to buying textbooks, students should consult the detailed course outline which will give the final versions of the weekly syllabus and the detailed breakdown of assignments with weighting and due dates.  The course outline will be posted in Moodle and discussed on the first day of class.

More information:  http://history.laps.yorku.ca/

AP/HIST 3781 3.0A (FALL): African Civilizations before Colonialism

Course Director: J. Curto, 315 York Lanes, (416)736-2100 x66965, jccurto@yorku.ca

Course Calendar Description: This course explores the rise and fall of African Civilizations before the advent of formal European colonialism in the late nineteenth century. By emphasizing the "African Genious" in the making (and unmaking) of complex societies throughout the continent over millennia so as to dispel ahistorical notions of the so-called "dark continent".  Prerequisites: None.  Co-requisites: None.  Course credit exclusions: None.

Expanded Course Description:

This course explores Civilizations in Africa from the rise of Ancient Egypt to the beginning of formal European colonial rule in 1885. Particular attention will be given to the rise and fall of kingdoms/empires throughout the continent and their (independent) relations with states in the Middle East, Europe and Asia. Within this context, themes such as agriculture, technology, culture, commerce, gender, and politics will be drawn upon to highlight the making, development, and unmaking of complex societies in Africa until the encroachment of Europeans increasingly halted such a process.

Tentative Grade Breakdown/Overview of Assessment:

Book Review: 20%
Essay: 40%
Final Take-Home Exam: 20%
Class Participation: 20%

NOTE: Prior to buying textbooks, students should consult the detailed course outline which will give the final versions of the weekly syllabus and the detailed breakdown of assignments with weighting and due dates.  The course outline will be posted in Moodle and discussed on the first day of class.

More information:  http://history.laps.yorku.ca/

AP/HIST 3785 3.0M (WINTER): Africa and Europe in the Age of Colonialism

Course Director: J. Curto, 315 York Lanes, (416)736-2100 x66965, jccurto@yorku.ca

Course Calendar Description: This course addresses the development of colonial empires across Africa and explores the interconnected histories of Africa and Europe from the French invasion of Algeria in 1830 to the period of decolonization in the1960s.

Course credit exclusions: None. Prior TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusion: AK/HIST 3951 3.00.

Expanded Course Description:

This course explores the interconnected histories of Africa and Europe from colonialism to present times. We will explore the rise of the major European empires across Africa between 1830 and 1914, assess their impact, and trace the development of African resistance and decolonization movements from World War One through the 1960s as well as issues and trends in contemporary Africa. Topics include the impact of trade and modernization on African societies, the importance of Africa to European politics, economics and societies, the growth of resistance movements and the rise of pan-Africanism, the migrations of Africans to Europe and Europeans to Africa, the impact of the world wars, the violence of decolonization, and the new scramble for Africa natural resources. Within these broad topics we will address the role of technology, literature, and material culture, as well as explore themes like class, race, gender and nationality.

Tentative Grade Breakdown/Overview of Assessment:

Book Review: 20%
Essay: 40%
Final Take-Home Exam: 20%
Class Participation: 20%

NOTE: Prior to buying textbooks, students should consult the detailed course outline which will give the final versions of the weekly syllabus and the detailed breakdown of assignments with weighting and due dates.  The course outline will be posted in Moodle and discussed on the first day of class.

More information:  http://history.laps.yorku.ca/

AP/HIST 3809 6.0A: History of the Christian Church: Beginnings to the Reformation

Course Director: R. Koopmans, 2182 Vari Hall, (416)736-2100 x30414, koopmans@yorku.ca

The course does not have a website.

Course Calendar Description: This course explores the stages of the developing Christian church from its origins in apostolic times to the late Middle Ages. Topics include personalities, institutional structure, leadership and rules, thought, education, liturgical and spiritual life, pastoral care, and the church in the secular world.

Course credit exclusions: AP/HIST/HUMA 3811 3.00, AP/HIST 3812 3.00, AP/HUMA 3458 3.00. PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusions: AK/HUMA 3458 3.00, AS/HIST 3809 6.00, AS/HIST/HUMA 3811 3.00, and AS/HIST 3812 3.00.

Expanded Course Description:

This course introduces students to the history of Christianity in the ancient, medieval, and early modern world, some 1700 years of history.  After tracing the birth and growth of Christianity in the Roman Empire, the course largely focuses on religious developments in western Europe, but some attention will be paid to Eastern Christianities. The nature of the medieval church and the course of the Reformation in the sixteenth century will be covered in some detail. Texts and textual analysis are central to the Christian religion, and careful reading will be a crucial activity in this class as well.  We will read some of the writings of historians working in the field today as well as texts written by premodern Christians themselves.  Students can expect a mixture of lecture and discussion in each class period, with numerous images to ponder and the occasional film or video as well.

Tentative Grade Breakdown/Overview of Assessment:

Students will be assessed on the basis of in-class examinations, a final exam, lengthy reading assignments, and a research paper.

NOTE: Prior to buying textbooks, students should consult the detailed course outline which will give the final versions of the weekly syllabus and the detailed breakdown of assignments with weighting and due dates.  The course outline will be posted in Moodle and discussed on the first day of class.

More information:  http://history.laps.yorku.ca/

AP/HIST 3825 3.0A (FALL): Indigenous People and the Law: Treaties, Dispossession and Murder, 1713-1886

Course Director: W. Wicken, 2192 Vari Hall, (416)736-2100 x66963, wwicken@yorku.ca

This course is a legal history of indigenous people in Canada and the United States from 1713 to 1886. The course examines the history of treaty making, the process by which indigenous people were dispossessed of their lands, and the extension of the common law into their communities. Specific murder cases are examined to illustrate how these changes affected them.

 

AP/HIST 3843 3.0A (FALL): Occupation, Collaboration and Death: A Social and Military History of the Second World War to 1944


Course Director: W. Wicken, 2192 Vari Hall, (416)736-2100 x66963, wwicken@yorku.ca

This course provides a global history of the Second World War. It begins in 1937 with the Japanese invasion of mainland China and ends in 1944 with the invasion of northern Europe (D-Day). The course examines how, in occupied and unoccupied regions, the war affected ordinary peoples' lives. Attention is on collaboration with the enemy and the killing of civilians.

AP/HIST 3844 3.0M (WINTER): Liberation, Violence, and Reconstruction: A History of the Second World War and its Aftermath, 1944-1949


Course Director: W. Wicken, 2192 Vari Hall, (416)736-2100 x66963, wwicken@yorku.ca

This course provides a global history of the Second World War from 1944 and its aftermath. The course begins in June 1944 with D-Day and ends in 1949 with the Communist Party's military victory in China. It examines how liberation resulted in violence, war crimes trials, and reconstruction of those communities the war had affected.

AP/HIST 3850 6.0A: Murder and Other Crimes: Law and Justice in 19th and 20th Century North America

Course Director: TBA

This course examines the Canadian and American criminal justice systems from the mid-19th through late 20th century. The course focuses on important trials - such as Lizzie Borden (1892), the "Scottsboro Boys" (1931), and Steven Truscott (1959) - and how our explanations of these crimes are shaped by factors such as politics and the popular press, racial stereotypes, and contemporary understandings of gender and class. The course also looks at the role of the legal system, particularly the Supreme Court, showing both how the criminal law was applied in murder trials, as well as how these cases often resulted in changing interpretations of the law, and new developments in our understandings of civil rights.

Prior TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusion: AS/HIST 3850 6.00.

AP/HIST 3880 6.0Y: Medicine and North American Society in Historical Perspective

(cross-listed with AP/SOSC 3090 6.0)

Course Director:  TBA

This course explores North American social and cultural responses to disease. It offers a critical, historical evaluation of the ways in which science accorded medicine a new intellectual and institutional status that transformed explanations for disease and patterns of healing/caregiving.

Course credit exclusions: None. PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusion: AS/SOSC 3090 6.00.

AP/HIST 3990 3.0A (F), AP/HIST 3990 3.0M (W), AP/HIST 3990 6.0A: Supervised Reading and Research

This course is normally open only to majors of exceptional ability (defined as a B+ or higher average in History) with the permission of the Chair or Director of Undergraduate Studies.  Students may take no more than six credits under this course rubric.

To apply for permission to do History 3990, students must submit a formal application to the Director of Undergraduate Studies, normally at the beginning of Term.  Application forms (available in Vari Hall 2140) require: a brief course description and rationale; a proposed evaluation breakdown (at least 60% of the final grade must be based on written work); a list of relevant History courses completed and in-progress; a representative bibliography (with a minimum of 20 titles listed in standard academic format); and the name and signature of the supervisor (who must normally be full-time faculty in the Department of History).  Students are responsible for finding Department members willing to serve as supervisor.

The Chair or Director of Undergraduate Studies must be satisfied that the subject of History 3990 is demonstrably distinct and separate from that of any other course taken by the student.  History 3990 may be supervised by the instructor in another of the student’s courses.

The detailed programme of study will be determined by the student and the supervisor.  Students are expected to prepare a substantial amount of written work. The student’s final grade will be based primarily (at least 60%) on the assessment of the written work by the course.

Normally, in any one year, no instructor may supervise more than a total of three courses under the rubrics of AP/HIST 4000 6.0 (Honours Essay), AP/HIST 4990 6.0 (Supervised Reading and Research), or AP/HIST 3990 6.0 (Supervised Reading and Research).

  • Students may take directed reading courses only after having successfully completed (passed)
  • 24 credits in the Faculty of Liberal Arts & Professional Studies.
  • The maximum permissible number of directed reading courses depends on a student’s program type. Students in Honours BA programs may take 24 such credits; students in a BA program may take 18 such credits.
  • Within their last 30 credits, students may take a maximum of 12 credits in directed reading courses.
  • Students may take a maximum of 12 credits of directed reading courses with the same faculty member.