3000 Level Courses

AP/HIST 3110 6.0A: Ancient Israel: From Its Origins in the Settlement to the Babylonian Exile

Course Director:  C. Ehrlich, 758 Kaneff Tower, (416)736-2100 x20191, ehrlich@yorku.ca

Course Calendar Description:
Investigations include methodological limitations; Old Testament, archaeology and ideology; Israel's origins; the settlement in Canaan; Philistia and the Israelite state; the Davidic Revolutions; the twin kingdoms; Assyria, Babylonia and the end of the Israelite people.

AP/HIST 3125 3.0M (WINTER): Sport and Society in Ancient Greece

(Crosslisted to: AP/CLST 3125 3.00)

Course Director:  TBA

Course Calendar Description:
This course studies the place of athletic competition in ancient Greek society, with a particular focus on the Archaic and Classical periods (eighth - fourth centuries BC) and on the panhellenic games, of which the Olympic Games were the most important.

AP/HIST 3131 6.0A: Rome and Empire: War to Pax Romana

(Crosslisted to: AP/CLST 3131 6.00)

Course Director:  J. Edmondson, 2178 Vari Hall, (416)736-2100 x30417, jedmond@yorku.ca

Course Calendar Description:
Topics considered include the nature of Roman imperialism, the mechanism of Roman conquest, the emergence of a system of provincial administration and the social, economic and cultural impact of conquest on Roman and provincial societies.

Expanded Course Description:  The course analyses Rome's growth from a small city-state on the Tiber to a vast Empire stretching at its zenith from the Atlantic Ocean to the Tigris and Euphrates during the period from c. 300 B.C. to c. A.D. 235. A variety of key themes to be explored include: the nature of Roman imperialism; the mechanisms of Roman conquest and the place of the army in Roman society; the integration of conquered peoples first in Italy and then in the wider Mediterranean world into the Roman state; the gradual evolution of a system of provincial administration; the social, economic and cultural impact of conquest on both Roman and provincial societies, with special attention being paid to the Hellenization of Rome under the Republic and the spread of Roman culture in Italy and the provinces, as the process of Roman conquest and imperial administration moved forwards. Throughout the course emphasis is placed about building students’ abilities to analyse a variety of primary sources in translation (literary, epigraphic, archaeological, artistic and numismatic) and to read critically some of the most important recent scholarship on Roman imperialism. The fact that the Roman Empire was a model for many later Empires lends a further special importance to its study.

Tentative Grade Breakdown/Overview of Assessment:

Short source analysis assignments (one per term) 20%: (10% each)
Essays (one per term): 40% (20% each)
Examinations (one per term):  30% (15% each)
Participation: 10%

NOTE: Prior to buying textbooks, students should consult the detailed course outline which will give the final versions of the weekly syllabus and the detailed breakdown of assignments with weighting and due dates.  The course outline will be posted in Moodle and discussed on the first day of class.

AP/HIST 3135 3.0A (FALL): Spectacle and Society in Ancient Rome

(Crosslisted to: AP/CLST 3135 3.00)

Course Director:  J. Edmondson, 2178 Vari Hall, (416)736-2100 x30417, jedmond@yorku.ca

Course Calendar Description:
This course traces the development of gladiatorial presentations, chariot-races and other public spectacles in Rome, Italy and the Roman Empire from 200 BC to 400 AD. It concentrates in particular on their changing nature, scale and socio-cultural function.

Expanded Course Description: The course traces the development of gladiatorial presentations, chariot-races, and other public spectacles in Rome, Italy and the provinces of the Roman Empire from c. 200 B.C. to A.D. 400.  It concentrates on their changing nature, scale and socio-cultural function. Themes explored include: the social, political, cultural, religious and penal importance of public spectacles in Roman society; their economic organization; the diffusion of Roman public spectacles in the wider Mediterranean world, Roman imperialism and cultural change; the geographical origins and social status of gladiators, charioteers and other public performers; cultural attitudes towards gladiatorial presentations and other public spectacles at Rome.  The course involves study of a wide range of primary source material –literary sources, inscriptions, iconographic and archaeological evidence– and a selection of the main scholarly literature on public spectacle in the Roman world.

Tentative Grade Breakdown/Overview of Assessment:

Source Assignment: 15%
Major Paper: 35%
Final Examination: 30%
Tutorial Participation: 10%
Quizzes: 10%

NOTE: Prior to buying textbooks, students should consult the detailed course outline which will give the final versions of the weekly syllabus and the detailed breakdown of assignments with weighting and due dates.  The course outline will be posted in Moodle and discussed on the first day of class.

AP/HIST 3321 6.0A: The Final Solution: Perspectives on the Holocaust

(Crosslisted to: AP/HUMA 3850 6.00)

Course Director:  TBA

Course Calendar Description: An examination of the Nazi attempt to exterminate the Jews: the historical and philosophical background, the theological and psychological implications, the history and literature of the period. Cross-Listing: AP/HIST 3321 6.00

AP/HIST 3356 3.0 A (FALL - ONLINE): Greeks in the World. A history of Greek migration and diaspora in the 20th Century

Course Director:  A. Gekas, 2120 Vari Hall, (416)736-2100 x30423, agekas@yorku.ca 

Course Calendar Description: Examines the history of migration from Greece to North America, Australia and Europe in the 19th and 20th centuries and combines a detailed historical narrative on the development of Greek diaspora with a more in-depth examination of specific communities. It also introduces students to the field of Diaspora and migration studies. Previously offered as: AP/HIST 3356 6.00.

 

AP/HIST 3392 3.0M (WINTER): The Spanish Civil War

Course Director:  A. Shubert, 2160 Vari Hall, (416)736-2100 x30431, adriansh@yorku.ca

Course Calendar Description: While examining the causes and nature of the Spanish Civil War, this course also considers the place of the conflict in European politics and culture.

 

AP/HIST 3420 6.0A: The British Empire from 1600 to the Present

Course Director:  TBA

Course Calendar Description: This course surveys the history of the British Empire from 1600 to the present, from the founding of the East India Company, to dominant world power, to decolonization and independence, to imperial nostalgia.

AP/HIST 3520 3.0A (FALL): History of Quebec Since 1867

Course Director:  TBA

Course Calendar Description: This course analyses the development of Quebec since Confederation. It looks at the cultural, economic, ideological, political, and social factors that have shaped Quebec society since 1867. Course credit exclusions: None.

Expanded Course Description: This course analyses the development of Quebec since Confederation. It looks at the political, cultural, economic, social and ideological factors that have shaped Quebec society from 1867 to the present. It focuses on a series of topics that will help students to understand the historical evolution of Quebec. These topics include economic development, the transformation of the political culture, immigration and its impact on society, Quebec's First Nations, the evolution of nationalism and the rise of the independence movement, the predominance and decline of the role of the Roman Catholic Church as a political and cultural force, the evolution of culture, the place of Quebec within Canada, its relations with other provinces, territories and francophone minority groups in the rest of the country, and Quebec in the world.

Tentative Grade Breakdown/Overview of Assessment:

Tutorial Participation: 15%
Book Review: 15%
Research Essay: 25%
Quizzes: 20% (4 x 5%)
Final Take Home Exam: 25%

Required text: John Dickinson and Brian Young, A Short History of Quebec, 4th ed. ISBN: 0-7735-2450-9

Other texts will be put in the reserve room and online.

AP/HIST 3531 6.0A: The Working Class in Canadian Society

(Crosslisted to: AP/SOSC 3210 6.00)

Course Director:  J. Stephen, 129 Founders College, (416)736-2100 x66930, stephenj@yorku.ca

Course Calendar Description: Explores the changing nature of paid and unpaid work in Canada in the 19th and 20th centuries and the impact of those changes on Canadian society. Course credit exclusion: AP/HIST 3250 6.00.

AP/HIST 3535 6.0A: African-Canadian History

Course Director: M. Johnson, 222 Founders College, (416)736-2100 x66933, johnsonm@yorku.ca

Course Calendar Description: Examines the history of African-Canadians from colonial contact in the 17th century through to the post-Second World War migrations from Africa and the Caribbean.

AP/HIST 3546 6.0A: History of Indigenous Peoples in Canada

Course Director: W. Wicken, 2192 Vari Hall, (416)736-2100 x66963, wwicken@yorku.ca

Course Calendar Description: Examines the history of Indigenous peoples within the area known today as Canada, from "time immemorial" to the postwar period. Topics may include origin stories; oral traditions; interactions with colonial empires; participation in the fur trade; epidemic diseases and health strategies; indigenous spirituality and Christian missionaries; treaties; the Indian Act; residential schooling; reserve life; political resistance; and land claims.

AP/HIST 3617 3.0A (FALL): Popular Culture, Political Economy, and American Identity: The United States from 1900 to 1945

Course Director:  K. Boyd, 2126 Vari Hall, (416)736-2100 x40609, kendrab@yorku.ca

Course Calendar Description: This course examines the intersection of popular culture and political economy to explore how American identity changed between 1900 and 1945. Through readings and documentary material on technology, migration, and urbanization, in-class discussion, and lectures, it explores the U.S. between 1900-1945 as both a nation and a complex process, rather than a fixed set of ideas, people, and spaces. Prerequisites: Students must have completed 24 credits to enroll.

Expanded Course Description:  This course examines the intersection of popular culture and political economy to explore the diverseness of “American identity” between 1900 and 1945. The course is thematic and will cover topics including: work, immigration, nativism, religious movements, political artistic expression, and multiple visions of democracy. Through lecture, primary and secondary sources, films, and in-class discussion, we will analyze the U.S. between 1900-1945 as both a nation and a complex process, rather than a fixed set of ideas, people, and spaces. The course will help students develop the skills necessary for advanced historical study.  These skills include the informed reading of historical texts, effective note-taking, critical analysis of primary sources, the development of sophisticated interpretations, and convincing writing.

Tentative Grade Breakdown/Overview of Assessment:

Participation (students must attend and contribute to discussions): 20%
Reading Responses: 20%
Annotated Outline of Essay: 10%
Essay: 20%
Final Exam: 30%

NOTE: Prior to buying textbooks, students should consult the detailed course outline which will give the final versions of the weekly syllabus and the detailed breakdown of assignments with weighting and due dates.  The course outline will be posted in Moodle and discussed on the first day of class.

AP/HIST 3618 3.0M (WINTER): United States Since 1945

Course Director:  M. Ladd-Taylor, 2136 Vari Hall, (416)736-2100 x30419, mltaylor@yorku.ca

Course Calendar Description: This course examines the conflicts and contradictions of American politics, culture, and society since the end of World War II. Through popular culture, journalism and political sources, we explore how social movements like civil rights, feminism, and the religious right changed the United States and probe the relationship between America's global military and economic power and ordinary people's lives. This course is open to students who have successfully completed 24 credits.

Expanded Course Description:  From the dropping of the atomic bomb over Hiroshima to the era of Donald Trump, the United States has been characterized by deep divisions over race, immigration, normative family values, and the changing role of the state. This course explores some of the key developments in the history of the United States since 1945, with an emphasis on the nation’s diversity and explaining present-day conflicts over American values and identity. Through popular culture, journalism and political sources, we explore how social movements like civil rights, feminism, and the religious right changed the United States and probe the relationship between America’s global military and economic power and ordinary people’s lives.

The course focuses on six intersecting themes: the relationship between domestic politics and foreign policy from the Cold War to the War on Terror; the political and economic power of television and consumer culture; the expansion of the federal government; urban-rural differences and the geographies of race and class; the influence of grassroots protest; and the “culture wars” over youth culture, gender, sexuality, immigration and race.

Tentative Grade Breakdown/Overview of Assessment: TBA

NOTE: Prior to buying textbooks, students should consult the detailed course outline which will give the final versions of the weekly syllabus and the detailed breakdown of assignments with weighting and due dates.  The course outline will be posted in Moodle and discussed on the first day of class.

AP/HIST 3622 3.0A (FALL): The U.S. Civil War in American History and Public Memory

Course Director:  B. Cothran, 2132 Vari Hall, (416)736-2100 x66959, cothran@yorku.ca

Course Calendar Description: This course, which focuses on the years from 1840 to 1877, explores the causes of the U.S. Civil War, military strategy, and the aftermath of this conflict. Topics examined include slavery, politics, military history and the era of Reconstruction. Course credit exclusion: AP/HIST 3602 6.00. Prior TO FALL 2014: AP/HIST 3622 3.00. Prior TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusion: AS/HIST 3622 3.00

AP/HIST 3670 3.0M (WINTER): US Business History Since 1880: The Origins and Consequences of Managerial Capitalism

Course Director:  K. Boyd, 2126 Vari Hall, (416)736-2100 x40609, kendrab@yorku.ca

Course Calendar Description: This course explores the inception, rise, development, maturing and present state of the US economy and the changing nature of business organization. Connections with political and social change will also be emphasized. Course credit exclusions: None.

Expanded Course Description:  Business has played a key role in shaping modern United States politics, society, and culture. This course explores the inception, rise, development, maturing and present state of the US economy and the changing nature of business organization. Connections with political and social change will also be emphasized. Themes we will examine include: free and unfree labor; industrialization; the rise of the corporation; entrepreneurship; technological innovation; mass consumption; booms and busts; economic inequality; and the relationship of U.S. business to the rest of the world. We will also explore the links between business and other aspects of American society, including race, gender, religion, law, and education.

Tentative Grade Breakdown/Overview of Assessment:

Participation (students must attend and contribute to discussions): 20%
Reading Responses: 20%
Annotated Outline of Essay: 10%
Essay: 20%
Final Exam: 30%

NOTE: Prior to buying textbooks, students should consult the detailed course outline which will give the final versions of the weekly syllabus and the detailed breakdown of assignments with weighting and due dates.  The course outline will be posted in Moodle and discussed on the first day of class.

AP/HIST 3710 3.0A (FALL): Reconstructing Society in the Post Slavery Caribbean

Course Director: D. Trotman, 326 Founders College, (416)736-2100 x33192, dtrotman@yorku.ca

Course Calendar Description: Examines the patterns of continuity and change in the institutions of post slavery Caribbean societies. The emphasis is on the processes of social re-engineering and cultural creation in the aftermath of nineteenth century slave emancipation and twentieth century revolution.

AP/HIST 3771 3.0A (FALL): Modern Chinese History I

Course Director: TBA

Course Calendar Description: The process by which modern China emerged from the ruins of the traditional order, tracing the history of China from the early 19th century to the present. Course credit exclusion: AP/HIST 3770 6.00.

AP/HIST 3773 3.0M (WINTER): Opium, Rebellion, and the Woman Question in China 1800-1911

Course Director: TBA

Course Calendar Description: This course engages the first seventy years of "China's 100 years of humiliation" (1842-1949). We examine China's often violent encounters with foreign powers beginning with the Opium Wars in the mid-19th century. Our focus is on China's efforts from 1800-1911 to become a modern nation through the reform of politics, society and the status of women, and ultimately through rebellion.

AP/HIST 3781 3.0A (FALL): African Civilizations before Colonialism

Course Director: J. Curto, 315 York Lanes, (416)736-2100 x66965, jccurto@yorku.ca

Course Calendar Description: Explores the rise and fall of African Civilizations before the advent of formal European colonialism in the late nineteenth century. By emphasizing the "African Genious" in the making (and unmaking) of complex societies throughout the continent over millennia so as to dispel ahistorical notions of the so-called "dark continent".

AP/HIST 3785 3.0M (WINTER): Africa and Europe in the Age of Colonialism

Course Director: J. Curto, 315 York Lanes, (416)736-2100 x66965, jccurto@yorku.ca

Course Calendar Description: This course addresses the development of colonial empires across Africa and explores the interconnected histories of Africa and Europe from the French invasion of Algeria in 1830 to the period of decolonization in the1960s.

AP/HIST 3809 6.0A: History Of The Christian Church: Beginnings To The Reformation

(Crosslisted to: AP/HUMA 3780 6.00)

Course Director: R. Koopmans, 2182 Vari Hall, (416)736-2100 x30414, koopmans@yorku.ca

Course Calendar Description:  Explores the stages of the developing Christian church from its origins in apostolic times to the late Middle Ages. Topics include personalities, institutional structure, leadership and rules, thought, education, liturgical and spiritual life, pastoral care, and the church in the secular world. Course credit exclusions: AP/HIST 3811 3.0, AP/HUMA 3811 3.00, AP/HIST 3812 3.00, AP/HUMA 3458 3.00.

AP/HIST 3843 3.0A (FALL): Occupation, Collaboration and Death: A Social and Military History of the Second World War to 1944

Course Director: W. Wicken, 2192 Vari Hall, (416)736-2100 x66963, wwicken@yorku.ca

Course Calendar Description:  This course provides a global history of the Second World War. It begins in 1937 with the Japanese invasion of mainland China and ends in 1944 with the invasion of northern Europe (D-Day). The course examines how, in occupied and unoccupied regions, the war affected ordinary peoples' lives. Attention is on collaboration with the enemy and the killing of civilians.

AP/HIST 3850 6.0A: Murder and Other Crimes: Law and Justice in 19th and 20th Century North America

Course Director: W. Wicken, 2192 Vari Hall, (416)736-2100 x66963, wwicken@yorku.ca

Course Calendar Description: Examines the Canadian and American criminal justice systems from the mid-19th through late 20th century. The course focuses on important trials - such as Lizzie Borden (1892), the ""Scottsboro Boys"" (1931), and Steven Truscott (1959) - and how our explanations of these crimes are shaped by factors such as politics and the popular press, racial stereotypes, and contemporary understandings of gender and class. The course also looks at the role of the legal system, particularly the Supreme Court, showing both how the criminal law was applied in murder trials, as well as how these cases often resulted in changing interpretations of the law, and new developments in our understandings of civil rights.

AP/HIST 3855 3.0A (FALL): Bad Kids: History, Culture, Media, and the Law in Canada and the U.S. Since the 1880s

Course Director:  M. Ladd-Taylor, 2136 Vari Hall, (416)736-2100 x30419, mltaylor@yorku.ca

Course Calendar Description: This course analyzes the social and cultural construction of "bad" kids in the U.S. and Canada since the 1880s through an examination of popular culture, social science literature, medicine, and the law. Topics include schooling, street culture, changing sexual norms, racialization, policing, juvenile delinquency, mental health, disability, the nature-nurture debate, and how "bad" kids saw themselves. Preequisites: None. Co-requisites: None. Course credit exclusions: None.

Expanded Course Description: We think of children as innocent, pure, and society’s hope for the future, but we are also bombarded with images of youngsters who are violent, spoiled, or out of control.  This course analyzes the social and cultural construction of “bad” kids in the U.S. and Canada since the 1880s. It explores the mutually constitutive relationship between the ideal of innocent childhood and the belief that some children are fundamentally bad.  It.  We look at adult constructions of “bad” children and how “bad” children saw themselves. A central question is: how have conceptions of “bad” children been shaped by race, gender, sexuality, class, and ability? Further, how have beliefs about why a child is “bad” and what constitutes “badness” changed over time?

Tentative Grade Breakdown/Overview of Assessment:

Participation: 20%
Papers: 60%
Take-home final exam: 20%

NOTE: Prior to buying textbooks, students should consult the detailed course outline which will give the final versions of the weekly syllabus and the detailed breakdown of assignments with weighting and due dates.  The course outline will be posted in Moodle and discussed on the first day of class.

AP/HIST 3990 3.0 & AP/HIST 3990 6.0: Supervised Reading and Research

Course Calendar Description: Supervised reading and research course. It is normally open only to undergraduate history majors of exceptional ability. Prospective candidates must submit in advance a written application for approval to the departmental Chair or undergraduate director. For more information regarding the application criteria, please contact the department. Note: For Faculty regulations on independent study courses, please consult the Faculty of Arts Independent Reading Courses section of this calendar.