1000 Level Courses

AP/HIST 1010 6.0A: War, Revolution and Society in the 20th Century

Course Director: J. Stephen, 129 Founders College, (416)736-2100 x66930, stephenj@yorku.ca

Course Calendar Description:
A study of the major political and social upheavals which have helped to shape the contemporary world. The course will concentrate on the origins of the two World Wars and the Cold War, and on their consequences. Topics chosen for detailed examination will vary from year to year.

AP/HIST 1025 6.0A: Ancient North America From the Last Ice Age to European Contact (ONLINE)

Course Director: C. Podruchny, 718 Kaneff Tower, carolynp@yorku.ca

DOWNLOAD DRAFT SYLLABUS
Moodle will be used for the course.
Here is a link to the course trailer: https://youtu.be/CAR4CbXETKA
Here is a link to the instructor’s personal website: http://www.carolynpodruchny.ca/pages/

Special Features: This course is fully online, with lectures, threaded discussions, assignments, and exams all done online. It includes a variety of guest lectures from various experts in the field.

Course Calendar Description:
This course studies the history of Indigenous people in North America from “time immemorial” to the regular settlement of Europeans in the 16th, 17th, and 18th centuries. Using a wide variety of sources it ranges from Meso-America to the High Arctic, and examines theories of the peopling of the continent; hunting, fishing and gathering; and the rise of corn civilizations.

Expanded Course Description:

  1. a) ethics, Kennewick Man, peopling of the world, oral traditions, scientific evidence, megafauna and spearpoints, Archaic Period, corn, Early Mesoamerica, Olmecs, Teotihuacan, Mayans, Earthworks in Woodlands, bison and salmon, affluent foragers, dykes and roads in the southwest, Hohokam, Mogollan, Anasazi, Militarizing Mesoamerica, Toltecs, Aztecs, Mississippi moundbuilders, Late Woodland, Iroquoians, Algonquians, Paleo-Eskimos, Norton, Yu’Pik, Aluetians, Dorset, Thule, Inuit, Vikings, Parsons Site, colonization, Indigenous resistance and resurgence

A detailed course outline/syllabus will be provided on the first day of class.

b) some idea of the readings :

  • Alice Beck Kehoe, America Before the European Invasions (Longman, 2002), ISBN: 0582414865
  • Timothy Pauketat, Cahokia: Ancient America’s Great City on the Mississippi (Penguin 2009), ISBN: 978-0-14-311747-6

c) objectives/outcomes of the course

Course Goals:

  1. To provide a broad and inclusive understanding of Indigenous history in North America from the last Ice Age to European contact. The course invites students to engage with Indigenous ways of knowing, and finds connections with traditional academic (often colonizing) methodologies.
  2. To introduce students to the craft of history and assist them in becoming apprentice historians. Students will learn about different types of primary sources, methods of analyzing them, theories in historical interpretation, and a diverse range of secondary sources.
  3. To help students succeed as university students in the liberal arts and become effective communicators and analyzers. Communication skills include reading, writing, listening, and speaking, and analytical skills include recalling, summarizing, synthesizing, interrogating, and assessing.
  4. As an online course, students have the added goal of engaging with new eLearning technologies. Students will practice communicating and learning in the electronic formats, and develop their skills in navigating online history resources, reading and assessing websites, and participating in online discussion forums.

Tentative Grade Breakdown/Overview of Assessment:

Assignment Percentage of Total Grade Due Date
Summarizing Academic Articles 10% October 4, 2019
Researching Mayan History with Websites 10% November 18, 2019
Thesis-Based Essay on Cahokia 10% February 10, 2019
Essay on Significance 10% March 16, 2020
Participation in Online Tutorials 20% Weekly
Midterm Exam 20% December Exam Period
Final Exam 20% April Exam Period

NOTE: Prior to buying textbooks, students should consult the detailed course outline which will give the final versions of the weekly syllabus and the detailed breakdown of assignments with weighting and due dates.  The course outline will be posted in Moodle and discussed on the first day of class.

AP/HIST 1080 6.0A: Growing Up In North America

Course Director: M. Ladd-Taylor, 2136 Vari Hall, (416)736-2100 x30419, mltaylor@yorku.ca

Course Calendar Description:
Examines what it meant to be young in different times and places in the United States and Canada, and explores the interplay of cultural and material circumstances that shaped ideas about childhood and children's actual lives.

Expanded Course Description:

What is childhood?  How has it changed over time?  This course examines what it meant to be young in different times and places in the United States and Canada, and provides an historical perspective on what is often seen as a ‘natural’ developmental stage.  We will ask how gender, race, class, religion, nationality, and ability have affected children’s experiences and concepts of childhood, and how children and childhood have influenced adults.  The course also provides an introduction to critical skills in research, writing, and historical analysis.

Tentative Grade Breakdown/Overview of Assessment:

Tutorial participation, 10% each term: 20%
Short papers: 30%
Exams & quizzes: 25%
Annotated bibliography & primary source analysis: 25%

NOTE: Prior to buying textbooks, students should consult the detailed course outline which will give the final versions of the weekly syllabus and the detailed breakdown of assignments with weighting and due dates.  The course outline will be posted in Moodle and discussed on the first day of class.

AP/HIST 1083 6.0A: Mass Media and Popular Culture in the Americas: Music, Movies and Power

Course Director: A. Rubenstein, 818 Kaneff Tower, (416)736-2100 x66961, arubenst@yorku.ca

Course Calendar Description:
This course introduces the historical study of culture and culture industries in the Americas since 1820, analyzing how cultural change both created and was created by transformations in politics, economics, and societies. Course credit exclusions: None. Prior TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusion: AS/HIST 1083 6.00.